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People and places: understanding geographical accuracy in administrative data from the census and healthcare systems

People and places: understanding geographical accuracy in administrative data from the census and healthcare systems
People and places: understanding geographical accuracy in administrative data from the census and healthcare systems
Administrative systems such as health care registration are of increasing importance in providing information for statistical, research, and policy purposes. There is thus a pressing need to understand better the detailed relationship between population characteristics as recorded in such systems and conventional censuses. This paper explores these issues using the unique Northern Ireland Longitudinal Study (NILS). It takes the 2001 Census enumeration as a benchmark and analyses the social, demographic and spatial patterns of mismatch with the health register at individual level. Descriptive comparison is followed by multivariate and multilevel analyses which show that approximately 25% of individuals are reported to be in different addresses and that age, rurality, education, and housing type are all important factors. This level of mismatch appears to be maintained over time, as earlier migrants who update their address details are replaced by others who have not yet done so. In some cases, apparent mismatches seem likely to reflect complex multi-address living arrangements rather than data error.
Administrative data, census, accuracy, spatial referencing
0308-518X
594-610
Shuttleworth, Ian
dc187c0c-3a9b-46a6-8675-ac05c21676de
Martin, David
e5c52473-e9f0-4f09-b64c-fa32194b162f
Shuttleworth, Ian
dc187c0c-3a9b-46a6-8675-ac05c21676de
Martin, David
e5c52473-e9f0-4f09-b64c-fa32194b162f

Shuttleworth, Ian and Martin, David (2016) People and places: understanding geographical accuracy in administrative data from the census and healthcare systems. Environment and Planning A, 48 (3), 594-610. (doi:10.1177/0308518X15618205).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Administrative systems such as health care registration are of increasing importance in providing information for statistical, research, and policy purposes. There is thus a pressing need to understand better the detailed relationship between population characteristics as recorded in such systems and conventional censuses. This paper explores these issues using the unique Northern Ireland Longitudinal Study (NILS). It takes the 2001 Census enumeration as a benchmark and analyses the social, demographic and spatial patterns of mismatch with the health register at individual level. Descriptive comparison is followed by multivariate and multilevel analyses which show that approximately 25% of individuals are reported to be in different addresses and that age, rurality, education, and housing type are all important factors. This level of mismatch appears to be maintained over time, as earlier migrants who update their address details are replaced by others who have not yet done so. In some cases, apparent mismatches seem likely to reflect complex multi-address living arrangements rather than data error.

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Shuttleworth and Martin 2016 complete.pdf - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 4 December 2015
Published date: March 2016
Keywords: Administrative data, census, accuracy, spatial referencing
Organisations: Geography & Environment

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 388361
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/388361
ISSN: 0308-518X
PURE UUID: e34ac3fd-e5d3-4700-a673-781a6ceeee07
ORCID for David Martin: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0397-0769

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 24 Feb 2016 15:22
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 13:09

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