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Deterritorialisation: reconceptualising development in the Pacific Islands

Deterritorialisation: reconceptualising development in the Pacific Islands
Deterritorialisation: reconceptualising development in the Pacific Islands
Development, as an idea and an industry, is premised on the assumption that all states have the ability to raise the material wellbeing of citizens. For many this appears to be working but the ideal is problematic for a sub-set of the world's smallest countries: the Pacific Island states. These states have sought to develop conventional export trade-based economies but are disadvantaged in this, and in service sector development, by a combination of well-known factors, including resource bases, size and location. By default, migration has become a least-worst development option for many island peoples and governments, involving engagement with the periphery and contributing to income generation and poverty alleviation. This deterritorialisation presents an alternative to mainstream development theory and practice in its current state-centric form, and emphasises the emerging significance of non-state approaches to development.
1360-0826
1-22
Connell, John
9405090c-a745-4334-9e7d-9264e70f9e20
Corbett, Jack
ad651655-ac70-4072-a36f-92165e296ce2
Connell, John
9405090c-a745-4334-9e7d-9264e70f9e20
Corbett, Jack
ad651655-ac70-4072-a36f-92165e296ce2

Connell, John and Corbett, Jack (2016) Deterritorialisation: reconceptualising development in the Pacific Islands. Global Society, 1-22. (doi:10.1080/13600826.2016.1158701).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Development, as an idea and an industry, is premised on the assumption that all states have the ability to raise the material wellbeing of citizens. For many this appears to be working but the ideal is problematic for a sub-set of the world's smallest countries: the Pacific Island states. These states have sought to develop conventional export trade-based economies but are disadvantaged in this, and in service sector development, by a combination of well-known factors, including resource bases, size and location. By default, migration has become a least-worst development option for many island peoples and governments, involving engagement with the periphery and contributing to income generation and poverty alleviation. This deterritorialisation presents an alternative to mainstream development theory and practice in its current state-centric form, and emphasises the emerging significance of non-state approaches to development.

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: March 2016
Published date: 8 April 2016
Organisations: Politics & International Relations

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 388371
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/388371
ISSN: 1360-0826
PURE UUID: de689011-7d99-49a5-912b-b39552857fda
ORCID for Jack Corbett: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-2005-7162

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 24 Feb 2016 12:26
Last modified: 23 Jul 2022 02:11

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Contributors

Author: John Connell
Author: Jack Corbett ORCID iD

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