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Democracy in the Pacific islands: comparable practices, contested meanings

Democracy in the Pacific islands: comparable practices, contested meanings
Democracy in the Pacific islands: comparable practices, contested meanings
Ian Shapiro identifies three traditions of democratic thought: aggregative, deliberative, and minimalist. All three are apparent in the Pacific Islands despite most commentators and donors assuming that the meaning of democracy is fixed. The focus in development studies on institutions and their capacity to deliver pro-poor growth has generated a fourth tradition that revolves around the now pervasive governance concept. Rather than focusing on the general will of a sovereign people, this perspective is predominately concerned with the legitimate use of violence as a precursor to any development-orientated democratic state. Having reviewed the literature on democracy in the Pacific to parse out these four meanings, this article concludes that paying greater attention to this ideational equivocality would extend discussions about the suitability and transferability of this type of regime.
2332-8894
22-40
Corbett, Jack
ad651655-ac70-4072-a36f-92165e296ce2
Corbett, Jack
ad651655-ac70-4072-a36f-92165e296ce2

Corbett, Jack (2015) Democracy in the Pacific islands: comparable practices, contested meanings. Democratic Theory, 2 (2), 22-40. (doi:10.3167/dt.2015.020203).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Ian Shapiro identifies three traditions of democratic thought: aggregative, deliberative, and minimalist. All three are apparent in the Pacific Islands despite most commentators and donors assuming that the meaning of democracy is fixed. The focus in development studies on institutions and their capacity to deliver pro-poor growth has generated a fourth tradition that revolves around the now pervasive governance concept. Rather than focusing on the general will of a sovereign people, this perspective is predominately concerned with the legitimate use of violence as a precursor to any development-orientated democratic state. Having reviewed the literature on democracy in the Pacific to parse out these four meanings, this article concludes that paying greater attention to this ideational equivocality would extend discussions about the suitability and transferability of this type of regime.

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e-pub ahead of print date: 1 December 2015
Organisations: Politics & International Relations

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 388375
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/388375
ISSN: 2332-8894
PURE UUID: 34a9fc0f-ff8e-46ce-90d3-cfb9bb7d60af
ORCID for Jack Corbett: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-2005-7162

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Date deposited: 24 Feb 2016 12:45
Last modified: 23 Jul 2022 02:11

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