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All the world is a stage: global governance, human resources and the ‘problem’ of smallness

All the world is a stage: global governance, human resources and the ‘problem’ of smallness
All the world is a stage: global governance, human resources and the ‘problem’ of smallness
The involvement of small island states (SISs) in a growing number of international organisations (IOs) has placed increased pressure on domestic bureaucracies and political systems. Rapid turnover among SIS leaders, combined with generational change and decreased local support, has amplified disadvantages. Growing complexity has therefore further exposed the long-standing vulnerabilities of SISs. They can play a creative role at the margins, and on certain issues in certain IOs, but in general asymmetries prevail. The lesson is that national sovereignty does not always equal control, and what might superficially appear to be equal access is constrained by the availability of technical expertise to the detriment of SISs.
0951-2748
435-459
Corbett, Jack
ad651655-ac70-4072-a36f-92165e296ce2
Connell, John
9405090c-a745-4334-9e7d-9264e70f9e20
Corbett, Jack
ad651655-ac70-4072-a36f-92165e296ce2
Connell, John
9405090c-a745-4334-9e7d-9264e70f9e20

Corbett, Jack and Connell, John (2015) All the world is a stage: global governance, human resources and the ‘problem’ of smallness. The Pacific Review, 28 (3), 435-459. (doi:10.1080/09512748.2015.1011214).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The involvement of small island states (SISs) in a growing number of international organisations (IOs) has placed increased pressure on domestic bureaucracies and political systems. Rapid turnover among SIS leaders, combined with generational change and decreased local support, has amplified disadvantages. Growing complexity has therefore further exposed the long-standing vulnerabilities of SISs. They can play a creative role at the margins, and on certain issues in certain IOs, but in general asymmetries prevail. The lesson is that national sovereignty does not always equal control, and what might superficially appear to be equal access is constrained by the availability of technical expertise to the detriment of SISs.

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 19 February 2015
Organisations: Politics & International Relations

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 388379
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/388379
ISSN: 0951-2748
PURE UUID: aa6a6112-3478-4aab-879d-194af3ecd893
ORCID for Jack Corbett: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-2005-7162

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Date deposited: 24 Feb 2016 13:04
Last modified: 09 Jan 2022 03:50

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Contributors

Author: Jack Corbett ORCID iD
Author: John Connell

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