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Ethics in Pharma: a case study from Cuba

Ethics in Pharma: a case study from Cuba
Ethics in Pharma: a case study from Cuba
Concerns about the lack of ethics of profit-maximizing organisations are increasing. The pharmaceutical industry attracts particular attention because of the high incidence of unethical behavior and because this industry is entrusted with the delivery of goods vital to human welfare. Ethical issues arise as a consequence of the inherent conflict between business and societal interests, including the focusing of investment into drugs that offer no increased therapeutic value at the expense of innovation into necessary but less lucrative treatments. We present evidence from a case-study of the Cuban biopharmaceutical sector to demonstrate how state-owned enterprise has enabled a long-term, sustainable and ethical strategy that prioritises public health needs. In contrast to the stereotype, we find that the state sector in market economies and the Cuban socialist economy is the main driver for innovation in the pharmaceutical industry and conclude that a government-centric organizational structure is better able than a corporate-centric organization of delivering sustainable therapeutic innovations.
Baden, D.
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Wilkinson, S.
515fffa9-1b52-4208-9898-563773dda70a
Davis, C.
b98148c3-cb02-4943-91a4-7ae0a23c681e
Baden, D.
daad83b9-c537-4d3c-bab6-548b841f23b5
Wilkinson, S.
515fffa9-1b52-4208-9898-563773dda70a
Davis, C.
b98148c3-cb02-4943-91a4-7ae0a23c681e

Baden, D., Wilkinson, S. and Davis, C. (2015) Ethics in Pharma: a case study from Cuba. BAM2015 Conference: The Value of Pluralism in Advancing Management Research, Education and Practice, United Kingdom. 08 - 10 Sep 2015.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Concerns about the lack of ethics of profit-maximizing organisations are increasing. The pharmaceutical industry attracts particular attention because of the high incidence of unethical behavior and because this industry is entrusted with the delivery of goods vital to human welfare. Ethical issues arise as a consequence of the inherent conflict between business and societal interests, including the focusing of investment into drugs that offer no increased therapeutic value at the expense of innovation into necessary but less lucrative treatments. We present evidence from a case-study of the Cuban biopharmaceutical sector to demonstrate how state-owned enterprise has enabled a long-term, sustainable and ethical strategy that prioritises public health needs. In contrast to the stereotype, we find that the state sector in market economies and the Cuban socialist economy is the main driver for innovation in the pharmaceutical industry and conclude that a government-centric organizational structure is better able than a corporate-centric organization of delivering sustainable therapeutic innovations.

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More information

Published date: September 2015
Venue - Dates: BAM2015 Conference: The Value of Pluralism in Advancing Management Research, Education and Practice, United Kingdom, 2015-09-08 - 2015-09-10
Organisations: Centre for Relational Leadership & Change

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 388440
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/388440
PURE UUID: fe7a0dbb-f845-4bb7-a85a-5234d040a079

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Date deposited: 01 Mar 2016 15:07
Last modified: 20 Sep 2018 16:31

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