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Association of maternal blood pressure in pregnancy with blood pressure of their offspring through adolescence

Association of maternal blood pressure in pregnancy with blood pressure of their offspring through adolescence
Association of maternal blood pressure in pregnancy with blood pressure of their offspring through adolescence
This article looks at the association of maternal blood pressure with the blood pressure of the offspring from birth to childhood. The Barker hypothesis states that maternal and “in utero” attributes during pregnancy affect a child’s cardiovascular health throughout life. We present an analysis of a unique dataset that consists of three distinct developmental processes: maternal cardiovascular health during pregnancy; fetal development; and child’s cardiovascular health from birth to 14 years. This study explored whether a mother’s blood pressure reading in pregnancy predicts fetal development and determines if this in turn is related to the future cardiovascular health of the child. This article uses data that have been collected prospectively from a Jamaican cohort which involves the following three developmental processes: (1) maternal cardiovascular health during pregnancy which is the blood pressure and anthropometric measurements at seven time-points on the mother during pregnancy; (2) fetal development which consists of ultrasound measurements of the fetus taken at six time-points during pregnancy; and (3) child’s cardiovascular health which consists of the child’s blood pressure measurements at 24 time-points from birth to 14 years. The inter-relationship of these three processes was examined using linear mixed effects models. Our analyses indicated that attributes later in childhood development, such as child’s weight, child’s baseline systolic blood pressure (SBP), age and sex, predict the future cardiovascular health of children. The results also indicated that maternal attributes in pregnancy, such as mother’s baseline SBP and SBP change, predicted significantly child’s SBP over time.
adolescence, blood pressure, cardiovascular disease (cvd), coronary heart disease (chd), fetal development, in utero, infant, maternal health, pregnancy, systolic
0300-5577
695-701
Royal-Thomas, T.
cf7988f3-31bb-4b5b-adfe-e33c11d4abc4
McGee, D.
f42a5401-9bc1-4bd2-bd74-85453d0c06f8
Sinha, D.
400bf90c-7107-4f10-98f3-06d1226e174b
Osmond, C.
2677bf85-494f-4a78-adf8-580e1b8acb81
Forrester, T.
84984e0d-1dd5-479c-91ed-b3d9c0fbd9d3
Royal-Thomas, T.
cf7988f3-31bb-4b5b-adfe-e33c11d4abc4
McGee, D.
f42a5401-9bc1-4bd2-bd74-85453d0c06f8
Sinha, D.
400bf90c-7107-4f10-98f3-06d1226e174b
Osmond, C.
2677bf85-494f-4a78-adf8-580e1b8acb81
Forrester, T.
84984e0d-1dd5-479c-91ed-b3d9c0fbd9d3

Royal-Thomas, T., McGee, D., Sinha, D., Osmond, C. and Forrester, T. (2015) Association of maternal blood pressure in pregnancy with blood pressure of their offspring through adolescence. Journal of Perinatal Medicine, 43 (6), 695-701. (doi:10.1515/jpm-2014-0038). (PMID:25178900)

Record type: Article

Abstract

This article looks at the association of maternal blood pressure with the blood pressure of the offspring from birth to childhood. The Barker hypothesis states that maternal and “in utero” attributes during pregnancy affect a child’s cardiovascular health throughout life. We present an analysis of a unique dataset that consists of three distinct developmental processes: maternal cardiovascular health during pregnancy; fetal development; and child’s cardiovascular health from birth to 14 years. This study explored whether a mother’s blood pressure reading in pregnancy predicts fetal development and determines if this in turn is related to the future cardiovascular health of the child. This article uses data that have been collected prospectively from a Jamaican cohort which involves the following three developmental processes: (1) maternal cardiovascular health during pregnancy which is the blood pressure and anthropometric measurements at seven time-points on the mother during pregnancy; (2) fetal development which consists of ultrasound measurements of the fetus taken at six time-points during pregnancy; and (3) child’s cardiovascular health which consists of the child’s blood pressure measurements at 24 time-points from birth to 14 years. The inter-relationship of these three processes was examined using linear mixed effects models. Our analyses indicated that attributes later in childhood development, such as child’s weight, child’s baseline systolic blood pressure (SBP), age and sex, predict the future cardiovascular health of children. The results also indicated that maternal attributes in pregnancy, such as mother’s baseline SBP and SBP change, predicted significantly child’s SBP over time.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 22 July 2014
e-pub ahead of print date: 28 August 2014
Published date: November 2015
Keywords: adolescence, blood pressure, cardiovascular disease (cvd), coronary heart disease (chd), fetal development, in utero, infant, maternal health, pregnancy, systolic
Organisations: Faculty of Medicine

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 388486
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/388486
ISSN: 0300-5577
PURE UUID: c175bdff-45ab-4467-9e3d-219d4a817546
ORCID for C. Osmond: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-9054-4655

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Date deposited: 26 Feb 2016 14:06
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 16:45

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Contributors

Author: T. Royal-Thomas
Author: D. McGee
Author: D. Sinha
Author: C. Osmond ORCID iD
Author: T. Forrester

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