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"Cows' milk exclusion diet during infancy: Is there a long term effect on children's eating behaviour and food preferences?"

"Cows' milk exclusion diet during infancy: Is there a long term effect on children's eating behaviour and food preferences?"
"Cows' milk exclusion diet during infancy: Is there a long term effect on children's eating behaviour and food preferences?"
BACKGROUND: Dietary restriction during infancy may influence later eating behaviour. The aim of this study was to determine if consuming a cows' milk exclusion (CME) diet during infancy affects eating habits in later childhood, once cows' milk has been reintroduced into the diet.

METHODS: Children were recruited from two large birth cohort studies in the UK. A small number of participants were recruited from allergy clinic. Two groups were recruited: an experimental group of children who had consumed a CME diet during infancy and a control group, who had consumed an unrestricted diet during infancy. Parents and children completed questionnaires regarding eating behaviour and food preferences.

RESULTS: 101 children of mean age 11.5 years were recruited (28 CME and 73 control). The CME group scored significantly higher on "slowness of eating" and on the combined "avoidant eating behaviour" construct (p < 0.01). The number of foods avoided and symptoms were associated with higher levels of avoidant eating behaviour (p < 0.05). The CME group rated liking for several dairy foods (butter, cream, chocolate, full fat milk and ice cream) significantly lower than the control group (p < 0.05), although there were no significant differences seen for any other category of food.

CONCLUSION: This study demonstrated that consuming a CME diet during infancy has persistent and long-term effects on eating habits and food preferences. To reduce future negative eating behaviours, children's exclusion diets need to be as varied as possible and reintroduction of cows' milk products closely monitored.
cows' milk allergy, eating behaviour, fussy eating, infant diet
0905-6157
141-146
Maslin, Kate
c5a832fd-2b82-4741-ab6c-4da45ffc91b8
Grundy, Jane
f8d6ced1-b9ab-4ee9-aa14-2f2805597fbe
Glasbey, Gillian
3554f23d-4709-4c2a-a972-2744f39fd7c8
Dean, Tara
b8719b02-a375-457f-aa33-74f9352613e6
Arshad, Syed Hasan
917e246d-2e60-472f-8d30-94b01ef28958
Grimshaw, Kate
766b6cf0-347a-447d-aeab-f07366f8ce28
Oliver, Erin
cb292c1c-fbcf-4742-99af-46160bafc792
Roberts, Graham
ea00db4e-84e7-4b39-8273-9b71dbd7e2f3
Venter, Carina
a9b7dd5e-b0cb-4068-be82-e15b587cc20b
Maslin, Kate
c5a832fd-2b82-4741-ab6c-4da45ffc91b8
Grundy, Jane
f8d6ced1-b9ab-4ee9-aa14-2f2805597fbe
Glasbey, Gillian
3554f23d-4709-4c2a-a972-2744f39fd7c8
Dean, Tara
b8719b02-a375-457f-aa33-74f9352613e6
Arshad, Syed Hasan
917e246d-2e60-472f-8d30-94b01ef28958
Grimshaw, Kate
766b6cf0-347a-447d-aeab-f07366f8ce28
Oliver, Erin
cb292c1c-fbcf-4742-99af-46160bafc792
Roberts, Graham
ea00db4e-84e7-4b39-8273-9b71dbd7e2f3
Venter, Carina
a9b7dd5e-b0cb-4068-be82-e15b587cc20b

Maslin, Kate, Grundy, Jane, Glasbey, Gillian, Dean, Tara, Arshad, Syed Hasan, Grimshaw, Kate, Oliver, Erin, Roberts, Graham and Venter, Carina (2016) "Cows' milk exclusion diet during infancy: Is there a long term effect on children's eating behaviour and food preferences?". Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, 27 (2), 141-146. (doi:10.1111/pai.12513). (PMID:26592369)

Record type: Article

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Dietary restriction during infancy may influence later eating behaviour. The aim of this study was to determine if consuming a cows' milk exclusion (CME) diet during infancy affects eating habits in later childhood, once cows' milk has been reintroduced into the diet.

METHODS: Children were recruited from two large birth cohort studies in the UK. A small number of participants were recruited from allergy clinic. Two groups were recruited: an experimental group of children who had consumed a CME diet during infancy and a control group, who had consumed an unrestricted diet during infancy. Parents and children completed questionnaires regarding eating behaviour and food preferences.

RESULTS: 101 children of mean age 11.5 years were recruited (28 CME and 73 control). The CME group scored significantly higher on "slowness of eating" and on the combined "avoidant eating behaviour" construct (p < 0.01). The number of foods avoided and symptoms were associated with higher levels of avoidant eating behaviour (p < 0.05). The CME group rated liking for several dairy foods (butter, cream, chocolate, full fat milk and ice cream) significantly lower than the control group (p < 0.05), although there were no significant differences seen for any other category of food.

CONCLUSION: This study demonstrated that consuming a CME diet during infancy has persistent and long-term effects on eating habits and food preferences. To reduce future negative eating behaviours, children's exclusion diets need to be as varied as possible and reintroduction of cows' milk products closely monitored.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 15 November 2015
e-pub ahead of print date: 21 January 2016
Published date: March 2016
Keywords: cows' milk allergy, eating behaviour, fussy eating, infant diet
Organisations: Human Development & Health

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 388662
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/388662
ISSN: 0905-6157
PURE UUID: e1acf583-c1a3-481a-b993-99c3203d4608
ORCID for Graham Roberts: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-2252-1248

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Date deposited: 01 Mar 2016 14:24
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 17:04

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