The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Association between anthropometry, cardiometabolic risk factors, and early life factors & adult measures of endothelial function: Results from the New Delhi Birth Cohort

Association between anthropometry, cardiometabolic risk factors, and early life factors & adult measures of endothelial function: Results from the New Delhi Birth Cohort
Association between anthropometry, cardiometabolic risk factors, and early life factors & adult measures of endothelial function: Results from the New Delhi Birth Cohort
BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVES: Abnormal endothelial function represents a preclinical marker of atherosclerosis. This study was conducted to evaluate associations between anthropometry, cardiometabolic risk factors, and early life factors and adult measures of endothelial function in a young urban Indian cohort free of clinical cardiovascular disease.

METHODS: Absolute changes in brachial artery diameter following cuff inflation and sublingual nitroglycerin (400 µg) were recorded to evaluate endothelium-dependent and -independent measures of endothelial function in 600 participants (362 men; 238 women) from the New Delhi Birth Cohort (2006-2009). Data on anthropometry, cardiometabolic risk factors, medical history, socio-economic position, and lifestyle habits were collected. Height and weight were recorded at birth, two and 11 yr of age. Age- and sex-adjusted linear regression models were developed to evaluate these associations.

RESULTS: The mean age of participants was 36±1 yr. Twenty two per cent men and 29 per cent women were obese (BMI th > 30 kg/m [2] ). Mean systolic blood pressure (SBP) was 131±14 and 119±13 mmHg, and diabetes prevalence was 12 and 8 per cent for men and women, respectively. Brachial artery diameter was higher for men compared with women both before (3.48±0.37 and 2.95±0.35 cm) and after hyperaemia (3.87±0.37 vs. 3.37±0.35 cm). A similar difference was seen before and after nitroglycerin. Markers of increased adiposity, smoking, SBP, and metabolic syndrome, but not early life anthropometry, were inversely associated with endothelial function after adjustment for age and sex.

INTERPRETATION & CONCLUSIONS: The analysis of the current prospective data from a young urban Indian cohort showed that cardiometabolic risk factors, but not early life anthropometry, were associated with worse endothelial function.
0971-5916
690-698
Huffman, M.D.
e7156af9-6f8e-4622-987c-d23dc3276dae
Khalil, A.
672213c3-6119-4791-8f0d-e90fcfa5d087
Osmond, C.
2677bf85-494f-4a78-adf8-580e1b8acb81
Fall, C.H.
7171a105-34f5-4131-89d7-1aa639893b18
Tandon, N.
22a63117-5ee8-4c6b-9db6-0f696755d50f
Lakshmy, R.
05ea6388-d501-4595-bc48-285f8c4663cf
Ramji, S.
489d8056-df5e-42e1-b397-aab5ad5e748b
Gera, T.
993416ea-d906-4603-b913-5bda72e9c12c
Probhakaran, P.
3413ae61-3b6a-4501-8f3c-15ae0f36442f
Dey Biswas, S.K.
ff0dccdd-9faa-439b-b038-ddd716573294
Reddy, K.S.
2204da4a-cddb-4d80-90ea-100cd306bd1f
Bhargava, S.K.
aaa4d65d-aa8b-463d-8dd2-51a9b8516f49
Sachdev, H.S.
9c9c8153-4c13-4e32-a1e9-798872efe4cb
Prabhakaran, D.
a272bffb-5ca4-4d20-af0e-e5de582889f9
Huffman, M.D.
e7156af9-6f8e-4622-987c-d23dc3276dae
Khalil, A.
672213c3-6119-4791-8f0d-e90fcfa5d087
Osmond, C.
2677bf85-494f-4a78-adf8-580e1b8acb81
Fall, C.H.
7171a105-34f5-4131-89d7-1aa639893b18
Tandon, N.
22a63117-5ee8-4c6b-9db6-0f696755d50f
Lakshmy, R.
05ea6388-d501-4595-bc48-285f8c4663cf
Ramji, S.
489d8056-df5e-42e1-b397-aab5ad5e748b
Gera, T.
993416ea-d906-4603-b913-5bda72e9c12c
Probhakaran, P.
3413ae61-3b6a-4501-8f3c-15ae0f36442f
Dey Biswas, S.K.
ff0dccdd-9faa-439b-b038-ddd716573294
Reddy, K.S.
2204da4a-cddb-4d80-90ea-100cd306bd1f
Bhargava, S.K.
aaa4d65d-aa8b-463d-8dd2-51a9b8516f49
Sachdev, H.S.
9c9c8153-4c13-4e32-a1e9-798872efe4cb
Prabhakaran, D.
a272bffb-5ca4-4d20-af0e-e5de582889f9

Huffman, M.D., Khalil, A., Osmond, C., Fall, C.H., Tandon, N., Lakshmy, R., Ramji, S., Gera, T., Probhakaran, P., Dey Biswas, S.K., Reddy, K.S., Bhargava, S.K., Sachdev, H.S. and Prabhakaran, D. (2015) Association between anthropometry, cardiometabolic risk factors, and early life factors & adult measures of endothelial function: Results from the New Delhi Birth Cohort. Indian Journal of Medical Research, 142 (6), 690-698. (doi:10.4103/0971-5916.174559). (PMID:26831418)

Record type: Article

Abstract

BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVES: Abnormal endothelial function represents a preclinical marker of atherosclerosis. This study was conducted to evaluate associations between anthropometry, cardiometabolic risk factors, and early life factors and adult measures of endothelial function in a young urban Indian cohort free of clinical cardiovascular disease.

METHODS: Absolute changes in brachial artery diameter following cuff inflation and sublingual nitroglycerin (400 µg) were recorded to evaluate endothelium-dependent and -independent measures of endothelial function in 600 participants (362 men; 238 women) from the New Delhi Birth Cohort (2006-2009). Data on anthropometry, cardiometabolic risk factors, medical history, socio-economic position, and lifestyle habits were collected. Height and weight were recorded at birth, two and 11 yr of age. Age- and sex-adjusted linear regression models were developed to evaluate these associations.

RESULTS: The mean age of participants was 36±1 yr. Twenty two per cent men and 29 per cent women were obese (BMI th > 30 kg/m [2] ). Mean systolic blood pressure (SBP) was 131±14 and 119±13 mmHg, and diabetes prevalence was 12 and 8 per cent for men and women, respectively. Brachial artery diameter was higher for men compared with women both before (3.48±0.37 and 2.95±0.35 cm) and after hyperaemia (3.87±0.37 vs. 3.37±0.35 cm). A similar difference was seen before and after nitroglycerin. Markers of increased adiposity, smoking, SBP, and metabolic syndrome, but not early life anthropometry, were inversely associated with endothelial function after adjustment for age and sex.

INTERPRETATION & CONCLUSIONS: The analysis of the current prospective data from a young urban Indian cohort showed that cardiometabolic risk factors, but not early life anthropometry, were associated with worse endothelial function.

Text
IndianJMedRes1426690-2440544_064645.pdf - Version of Record
Download (381kB)

More information

Published date: December 2015
Organisations: Faculty of Medicine

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 389332
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/389332
ISSN: 0971-5916
PURE UUID: 9233bfd1-9462-4872-ab1f-3acb43bf60e8
ORCID for C. Osmond: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-9054-4655
ORCID for C.H. Fall: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4402-5552

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 04 Mar 2016 11:52
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 16:45

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: M.D. Huffman
Author: A. Khalil
Author: C. Osmond ORCID iD
Author: C.H. Fall ORCID iD
Author: N. Tandon
Author: R. Lakshmy
Author: S. Ramji
Author: T. Gera
Author: P. Probhakaran
Author: S.K. Dey Biswas
Author: K.S. Reddy
Author: S.K. Bhargava
Author: H.S. Sachdev
Author: D. Prabhakaran

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×