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Low birth weight and features of neuroticism and mood disorder in 83 545 participants of the UK Biobank cohort

Low birth weight and features of neuroticism and mood disorder in 83 545 participants of the UK Biobank cohort
Low birth weight and features of neuroticism and mood disorder in 83 545 participants of the UK Biobank cohort
Background: Low birth weight has been inconsistently associated with risk of developing affective disorders, including major depressive disorder (MDD). To date, studies investigating possible associations between birth weight and bipolar disorder (BD), or personality traits known to predispose to affective disorders such as neuroticism, have not been conducted in large cohorts.

Aims: To assess whether very low birth weight (<1500 g) and low birth weight (1500–2490 g) were associated with higher neuroticism scores assessed in middle age, and lifetime history of either MDD or BD. We controlled for possible confounding factors.

Method: Retrospective cohort study using baseline data on the 83?545 UK Biobank participants with detailed mental health and birth weight data. Main outcomes were prevalent MDD and BD, and neuroticism assessed using the Eysenck Personality Inventory Neuroticism scale - Revised (EPIN-R)

Results: Referent to normal birth weight, very low/low birth weight were associated with higher neuroticism scores, increased MDD and BD. The associations between birth weight category and MDD were partially mediated by higher neuroticism.

Conclusions: These findings suggest that intrauterine programming may play a role in lifetime vulnerability to affective disorders.
38-44
Lyall, Donald M.
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Inskip, Hazel M.
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Mackay, Daniel
1b7d0644-3094-483a-a664-e2a37e80951f
Deary, Ian J.
027158ae-fbfb-40ea-98b1-32d2690499ac
McIntosh, Andrew M.
126b1f77-19e2-4784-8a6a-6c537e6bd383
Hotopf, Matthew
5a23f5d8-579f-4386-ae4b-07bfebe1b5fa
Kendrick, Tony
c697a72c-c698-469d-8ac2-f00df40583e5
Pell, Jill P.
7b252215-2152-46a3-bdcc-e499ce8d8b7c
Smith, Daniel J.
e9990c06-dd07-4301-8bd4-d24d18efa65e
Lyall, Donald M.
adc0de26-207f-46e9-b92b-e544630b585b
Inskip, Hazel M.
5fb4470a-9379-49b2-a533-9da8e61058b7
Mackay, Daniel
1b7d0644-3094-483a-a664-e2a37e80951f
Deary, Ian J.
027158ae-fbfb-40ea-98b1-32d2690499ac
McIntosh, Andrew M.
126b1f77-19e2-4784-8a6a-6c537e6bd383
Hotopf, Matthew
5a23f5d8-579f-4386-ae4b-07bfebe1b5fa
Kendrick, Tony
c697a72c-c698-469d-8ac2-f00df40583e5
Pell, Jill P.
7b252215-2152-46a3-bdcc-e499ce8d8b7c
Smith, Daniel J.
e9990c06-dd07-4301-8bd4-d24d18efa65e

Lyall, Donald M., Inskip, Hazel M., Mackay, Daniel, Deary, Ian J., McIntosh, Andrew M., Hotopf, Matthew, Kendrick, Tony, Pell, Jill P. and Smith, Daniel J. (2016) Low birth weight and features of neuroticism and mood disorder in 83 545 participants of the UK Biobank cohort. BJPsych Open, 2 (1), 38-44. (doi:10.1192/bjpo.bp.115.002154).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: Low birth weight has been inconsistently associated with risk of developing affective disorders, including major depressive disorder (MDD). To date, studies investigating possible associations between birth weight and bipolar disorder (BD), or personality traits known to predispose to affective disorders such as neuroticism, have not been conducted in large cohorts.

Aims: To assess whether very low birth weight (<1500 g) and low birth weight (1500–2490 g) were associated with higher neuroticism scores assessed in middle age, and lifetime history of either MDD or BD. We controlled for possible confounding factors.

Method: Retrospective cohort study using baseline data on the 83?545 UK Biobank participants with detailed mental health and birth weight data. Main outcomes were prevalent MDD and BD, and neuroticism assessed using the Eysenck Personality Inventory Neuroticism scale - Revised (EPIN-R)

Results: Referent to normal birth weight, very low/low birth weight were associated with higher neuroticism scores, increased MDD and BD. The associations between birth weight category and MDD were partially mediated by higher neuroticism.

Conclusions: These findings suggest that intrauterine programming may play a role in lifetime vulnerability to affective disorders.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 29 November 2015
Published date: 28 January 2016
Organisations: Primary Care & Population Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 389432
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/389432
PURE UUID: 10d97b2d-d2b7-47f4-9222-aaa4e247fad9
ORCID for Hazel M. Inskip: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-8897-1749
ORCID for Tony Kendrick: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1618-9381

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Date deposited: 07 Mar 2016 14:57
Last modified: 20 Jul 2019 01:15

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