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That others matter: the moral achievement—care ethics and citizenship in practice with people with dementia

That others matter: the moral achievement—care ethics and citizenship in practice with people with dementia
That others matter: the moral achievement—care ethics and citizenship in practice with people with dementia
There are opportunities in practice for practitioners to sustain the citizenship of the people with whom they work. These opportunities arise as a matter of everyday decision-making, in the ways that service users and their families are facilitated to participate in decisions affecting their lives. Citizenship also hinges on the organisation of services to meet the needs of service users and carers. In this article, a care situation which fails to meet the needs of one family is examined using an ethics of care. A social worker reflects on her role in the decision-making and the eventual lack of commitment from a wider team to provide good care. To answer yes to the question of whether others matter, we need to consider whether the moral acheivement has been accomplished; that is to show in practice, that others do matter.
ethics of care, marginalised people, participation, practice, citizenship
1749-6535
210-216
Brannelly, Tula
c37a8667-d2f6-4455-ba06-cb8bb1637d6a
Brannelly, Tula
c37a8667-d2f6-4455-ba06-cb8bb1637d6a

Brannelly, Tula (2011) That others matter: the moral achievement—care ethics and citizenship in practice with people with dementia. [in special issue: Care Ethics: New Theories and Applications—Part II ] Ethics and Social Welfare, 5 (2), 210-216. (doi:10.1080/17496535.2010.484267).

Record type: Article

Abstract

There are opportunities in practice for practitioners to sustain the citizenship of the people with whom they work. These opportunities arise as a matter of everyday decision-making, in the ways that service users and their families are facilitated to participate in decisions affecting their lives. Citizenship also hinges on the organisation of services to meet the needs of service users and carers. In this article, a care situation which fails to meet the needs of one family is examined using an ethics of care. A social worker reflects on her role in the decision-making and the eventual lack of commitment from a wider team to provide good care. To answer yes to the question of whether others matter, we need to consider whether the moral acheivement has been accomplished; that is to show in practice, that others do matter.

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More information

Published date: May 2011
Keywords: ethics of care, marginalised people, participation, practice, citizenship
Organisations: Faculty of Health Sciences, Researcher Development

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 389535
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/389535
ISSN: 1749-6535
PURE UUID: c53058ab-5826-4425-8539-4f464106f975

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Date deposited: 08 Mar 2016 15:46
Last modified: 17 Jul 2017 19:33

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Author: Tula Brannelly

University divisions

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