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Negotiating ethics in dementia care: an analysis of an ethic of care in practice

Negotiating ethics in dementia care: an analysis of an ethic of care in practice
Negotiating ethics in dementia care: an analysis of an ethic of care in practice
Providing care for people with dementia is often complex and ethically difficult, and is guided by the values of people with dementia and professional and lay carers. Each participant brings often different, and sometimes conflicting, perspectives, which contribute to the difficulty of negotiating suitable care. This research examined how participation and inclusion were facilitated by community psychiatric nurses and social workers to achieve care for people with dementia. Practice was observed to provide snapshots of interactions between people with dementia, practitioners and lay carers, and interviews with practitioners interrogated practice. The analytical framework used was Tronto's (1993) ‘integrity of care’, taken from the wider feminist political argument of an ethic of care (Gilligan, 1982). The adoption in practice of an ethic of care strengthens the opportunity for increased participation and inclusion and therefore aims to provide care that fits with the values and preferences of people with dementia and their carers. The research found that of 50 people with dementia, 10 were placed in permanent placements such as nursing homes and residential homes, some unwillingly. This article discusses what happens in care when the ethical elements of an ethic of care are practised, and when they are not.
citizenship, collaboration, multidisciplinary practice, relationship-based care, values
1471-3012
197-212
Brannelly, Tula
c37a8667-d2f6-4455-ba06-cb8bb1637d6a
Brannelly, Tula
c37a8667-d2f6-4455-ba06-cb8bb1637d6a

Brannelly, Tula (2006) Negotiating ethics in dementia care: an analysis of an ethic of care in practice. Dementia, 5 (2), 197-212. (doi:10.1177/1471301206062249).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Providing care for people with dementia is often complex and ethically difficult, and is guided by the values of people with dementia and professional and lay carers. Each participant brings often different, and sometimes conflicting, perspectives, which contribute to the difficulty of negotiating suitable care. This research examined how participation and inclusion were facilitated by community psychiatric nurses and social workers to achieve care for people with dementia. Practice was observed to provide snapshots of interactions between people with dementia, practitioners and lay carers, and interviews with practitioners interrogated practice. The analytical framework used was Tronto's (1993) ‘integrity of care’, taken from the wider feminist political argument of an ethic of care (Gilligan, 1982). The adoption in practice of an ethic of care strengthens the opportunity for increased participation and inclusion and therefore aims to provide care that fits with the values and preferences of people with dementia and their carers. The research found that of 50 people with dementia, 10 were placed in permanent placements such as nursing homes and residential homes, some unwillingly. This article discusses what happens in care when the ethical elements of an ethic of care are practised, and when they are not.

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Published date: May 2006
Keywords: citizenship, collaboration, multidisciplinary practice, relationship-based care, values
Organisations: Faculty of Health Sciences, Researcher Development

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 389543
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/389543
ISSN: 1471-3012
PURE UUID: 5e0163f8-5cb0-41ac-a7a1-47012a93cac1

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Date deposited: 08 Mar 2016 16:40
Last modified: 15 Jul 2019 20:42

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Author: Tula Brannelly

University divisions

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