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Repartnering dynamics and fertility in new partnerships in Europe and the United States

Repartnering dynamics and fertility in new partnerships in Europe and the United States
Repartnering dynamics and fertility in new partnerships in Europe and the United States
This thesis is motivated by the wide family changes which started in the 1960s in Europe and the United States. In light of the process of the deinstitutionalisation of marriage, the thesis examines the role of increasing marital instability and rising prevalence of cohabitation in repartnering and fertility after union dissolution. The thesis has three objectives: (i) to provide detailed description of the state of women’s repartnering dynamics by union type in Europe and the US, (ii) to examine the role of women’s demographic characteristics in repartnering behaviour in 14 European countries, and (iii) to assess the effect of mothers’ partnership history on continued childbearing following separation. The objectives of this thesis are addressed by using the Harmonized Histories and employing demographic approach (life-table estimates) and statistical methods (discrete-time hazard models). Findings regarding objective (i): The results show an increase in women’s repartnering levels across birth cohorts, however, substantial cross-national difference exists. Repartnering starts predominantly with cohabitation, yet countries differ significantly in the pace at which repartnering occurs. There is a strong positive association between the level of union dissolution and the pace of repartnering in Europe and the US. The proportion of women who repartner within 5 years after first union dissolution is similar or slightly higher for previously cohabiting women than for divorcees. Findings regarding objective (ii): Women’s age and presence of children at union dissolution have strong negative effects on repartnering in all European countries. First union type has no significant effect on repartnering. The variation in micro-level demographic characteristics does not fully explain the cross-national differences in repartnering behaviour in Europe. More research on the role of macro-level factors in explaining cross-national differences in repartnering is needed. Findings regarding objective (iii): The union type in which women entered motherhood does not matter for continued childbearing after separation. Current union status is significantly associated with mothers’ birth risks after dissolution of first fertile union. Currently cohabiting women have significantly lower birth risks after separation than currently married mothers. The birth risks of currently married or currently cohabiting mothers do not depend on the type of union in which women entered motherhood. The results indicate that despite increases in cohabitation childbearing is still associated with marriage.
Galezewska, Paulina
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Galezewska, Paulina
a4dd4b21-ef84-4261-b783-e8b919efdd78
Perelli-Harris, Brienna
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Berrington, Ann
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(2016) Repartnering dynamics and fertility in new partnerships in Europe and the United States. University of Southampton, School of Social Sciences, Doctoral Thesis, 272pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

This thesis is motivated by the wide family changes which started in the 1960s in Europe and the United States. In light of the process of the deinstitutionalisation of marriage, the thesis examines the role of increasing marital instability and rising prevalence of cohabitation in repartnering and fertility after union dissolution. The thesis has three objectives: (i) to provide detailed description of the state of women’s repartnering dynamics by union type in Europe and the US, (ii) to examine the role of women’s demographic characteristics in repartnering behaviour in 14 European countries, and (iii) to assess the effect of mothers’ partnership history on continued childbearing following separation. The objectives of this thesis are addressed by using the Harmonized Histories and employing demographic approach (life-table estimates) and statistical methods (discrete-time hazard models). Findings regarding objective (i): The results show an increase in women’s repartnering levels across birth cohorts, however, substantial cross-national difference exists. Repartnering starts predominantly with cohabitation, yet countries differ significantly in the pace at which repartnering occurs. There is a strong positive association between the level of union dissolution and the pace of repartnering in Europe and the US. The proportion of women who repartner within 5 years after first union dissolution is similar or slightly higher for previously cohabiting women than for divorcees. Findings regarding objective (ii): Women’s age and presence of children at union dissolution have strong negative effects on repartnering in all European countries. First union type has no significant effect on repartnering. The variation in micro-level demographic characteristics does not fully explain the cross-national differences in repartnering behaviour in Europe. More research on the role of macro-level factors in explaining cross-national differences in repartnering is needed. Findings regarding objective (iii): The union type in which women entered motherhood does not matter for continued childbearing after separation. Current union status is significantly associated with mothers’ birth risks after dissolution of first fertile union. Currently cohabiting women have significantly lower birth risks after separation than currently married mothers. The birth risks of currently married or currently cohabiting mothers do not depend on the type of union in which women entered motherhood. The results indicate that despite increases in cohabitation childbearing is still associated with marriage.

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Published date: January 2016
Organisations: University of Southampton, Social Statistics & Demography

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 389712
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/389712
PURE UUID: 169253bd-d554-40d2-9202-1823b5034dce
ORCID for Brienna Perelli-Harris: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-8234-4007
ORCID for Ann Berrington: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1683-6668

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 14 Mar 2016 13:56
Last modified: 22 Sep 2020 01:32

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