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Citizenship and people living with dementia: a case for the ethics of care

Citizenship and people living with dementia: a case for the ethics of care
Citizenship and people living with dementia: a case for the ethics of care
The ethics of care is an emerging field of interest in many disciplines, including care for people with dementia. The ethics of care as proposed by Joan Tronto (1993 and 2013) is a political argument for care together with a set of principles, the integrity of care, to guide and critique practice. This two-pronged approach enables on one hand, a political, complex and situated examination of inequality, and on the other hand the integrity of care provides a set of principles to guide inclusive citizenship practices. This approach has the significant advantage of recognition of the fight that people with dementia face to achieve rights and citizenship as an issue of social justice. In this paper, three challenges to citizenship are discussed in relation to people with dementia using an ethics of care lens–1) citizenship as a relationship between the individual and the state; 2) citizenship as a practice; and 3) citizenship as identity and belonging. I propose that citizenship can be achieved by promoting inclusion in defining and creating policy, research and practice.
dementia, ethics of care, social justice, citizenship
1471-3012
1-15
Brannelly, Tula
c37a8667-d2f6-4455-ba06-cb8bb1637d6a
Brannelly, Tula
c37a8667-d2f6-4455-ba06-cb8bb1637d6a

Brannelly, Tula (2016) Citizenship and people living with dementia: a case for the ethics of care. Dementia, 1-15.

Record type: Article

Abstract

The ethics of care is an emerging field of interest in many disciplines, including care for people with dementia. The ethics of care as proposed by Joan Tronto (1993 and 2013) is a political argument for care together with a set of principles, the integrity of care, to guide and critique practice. This two-pronged approach enables on one hand, a political, complex and situated examination of inequality, and on the other hand the integrity of care provides a set of principles to guide inclusive citizenship practices. This approach has the significant advantage of recognition of the fight that people with dementia face to achieve rights and citizenship as an issue of social justice. In this paper, three challenges to citizenship are discussed in relation to people with dementia using an ethics of care lens–1) citizenship as a relationship between the individual and the state; 2) citizenship as a practice; and 3) citizenship as identity and belonging. I propose that citizenship can be achieved by promoting inclusion in defining and creating policy, research and practice.

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Citizenship and people living with dementia - a case for the ethics of care.docx - Accepted Manuscript
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Accepted/In Press date: 24 February 2016
Keywords: dementia, ethics of care, social justice, citizenship
Organisations: Faculty of Health Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 389753
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/389753
ISSN: 1471-3012
PURE UUID: a6c2a733-dce2-4350-b0f5-c1bbdb5fb0f1

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Date deposited: 14 Mar 2016 14:43
Last modified: 17 Jul 2017 19:32

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