The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Attachment security and self-compassion priming increase the likelihood that first-time engagers in mindfulness meditation will continue with mindfulness training

Attachment security and self-compassion priming increase the likelihood that first-time engagers in mindfulness meditation will continue with mindfulness training
Attachment security and self-compassion priming increase the likelihood that first-time engagers in mindfulness meditation will continue with mindfulness training
Mindfulness practice has many mental and physical health benefits but can be perceived as ‘difficult’ by some individuals. This perception can discourage compliance with mindfulness meditation training programs. The present research examined whether the activation of thoughts and feelings related to attachment security and self-compassion (through semantic priming) prior to a mindfulness meditation session might influence willingness to engage in future mindfulness training. We expected both of these primes to positively influence participants’ willingness to continue with mindfulness training. We primed 117 meditation-naïve individuals (84 female; mean age of 22.3 years, SD = 4.83) with either a self-compassion, attachment security or a neutral control prime prior to an introductory mindfulness exercise and measured their post-session willingness to engage in further training. Both experimental primes resulted in higher willingness to engage in further mindfulness training relative to the control condition. The self-compassion prime did so indirectly by increasing state mindfulness, while the attachment security prime had a direct effect. This study supports theoretical links between self-compassion and mindfulness and reveals a causal role for these factors in promoting willingness to engage in mindfulness training. Our findings have implications for improving compliance with mindfulness intervention programs.
1868-8527
642–650
Rowe, Angela
386d6cd6-dead-4291-9b24-ea45f99c4bf0
Shepstone, Laura
f8dfaa8b-14ff-48df-bbfa-4f293bcd53dc
Carnelley, Katherine
02a55020-a0bc-480e-a0ff-c8fe56ee9c36
Cavanagh, Kate
2386a03f-b8d6-457b-a597-1ed4c0b0e1d0
Millings, Abigail
c759d261-4073-4279-a892-2f74e01d115a
Rowe, Angela
386d6cd6-dead-4291-9b24-ea45f99c4bf0
Shepstone, Laura
f8dfaa8b-14ff-48df-bbfa-4f293bcd53dc
Carnelley, Katherine
02a55020-a0bc-480e-a0ff-c8fe56ee9c36
Cavanagh, Kate
2386a03f-b8d6-457b-a597-1ed4c0b0e1d0
Millings, Abigail
c759d261-4073-4279-a892-2f74e01d115a

Rowe, Angela, Shepstone, Laura, Carnelley, Katherine, Cavanagh, Kate and Millings, Abigail (2016) Attachment security and self-compassion priming increase the likelihood that first-time engagers in mindfulness meditation will continue with mindfulness training. Mindfulness, 7 (3), 642–650. (doi:10.1007/s12671-016-0499-7).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Mindfulness practice has many mental and physical health benefits but can be perceived as ‘difficult’ by some individuals. This perception can discourage compliance with mindfulness meditation training programs. The present research examined whether the activation of thoughts and feelings related to attachment security and self-compassion (through semantic priming) prior to a mindfulness meditation session might influence willingness to engage in future mindfulness training. We expected both of these primes to positively influence participants’ willingness to continue with mindfulness training. We primed 117 meditation-naïve individuals (84 female; mean age of 22.3 years, SD = 4.83) with either a self-compassion, attachment security or a neutral control prime prior to an introductory mindfulness exercise and measured their post-session willingness to engage in further training. Both experimental primes resulted in higher willingness to engage in further mindfulness training relative to the control condition. The self-compassion prime did so indirectly by increasing state mindfulness, while the attachment security prime had a direct effect. This study supports theoretical links between self-compassion and mindfulness and reveals a causal role for these factors in promoting willingness to engage in mindfulness training. Our findings have implications for improving compliance with mindfulness intervention programs.

Text
__soton.ac.uk_ude_personalfiles_users_kc6_mydocuments_document_RESEARCH_Angela_Mindfulness_Mindfulness - try 5_Revision_final copy_mindfulness manuscript_FINALrevisions 03 02 2016.doc - Accepted Manuscript
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.
Download (219kB)
Text
art%3A10.1007%2Fs12671-016-0499-7.pdf - Version of Record
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.
Download (389kB)

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 1 February 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 29 February 2016
Published date: June 2016

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 389761
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/389761
ISSN: 1868-8527
PURE UUID: 499722ad-1b01-473b-8db5-e2561468953f

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 14 Mar 2016 15:11
Last modified: 15 Aug 2019 05:34

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×