The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Adaptation to life in the High Andes: nocturnal oxyhemoglobin saturation in early development

Adaptation to life in the High Andes: nocturnal oxyhemoglobin saturation in early development
Adaptation to life in the High Andes: nocturnal oxyhemoglobin saturation in early development
Study objectives: physiological adaptation to high altitude hypoxia may be impaired in Andeans with significant European ancestry. The respiratory ‘burden’ of sleep may challenge adaptation, leading to relative nocturnal hypoxia. Developmental aspects of sleep-related breathing in high-altitude native children have not previously been reported. We aimed to determine the influence of development on diurnal-nocturnal oxyhemoglobin differences in children living at high altitude.

Methods: this was a cross-sectional, observational study. Seventy-five healthy Bolivian children aged 6 mo to 17 y, native to low altitude (500 m), moderate high altitude (2,500 m), and high altitude (3,700 m) were recruited. Daytime resting pulse oximetry was compared to overnight recordings using Masimo radical oximeters. Genetic ancestry was determined from DNA samples.

Results: children had mixed European/Amerindian ancestry, with no significant differences between altitudes. Sixty-two participants had ? 5 h of nocturnal, artifact-free data. As predicted, diurnal mean oxyhemoglobin saturation decreased across altitudes (infants and children, both P < 0.001), with lowest diurnal values at high altitude in infants. At high altitude, there was a greater drop in nocturnal mean oxyhemoglobin saturation (infants, P < 0.001; children, P = 0.039) and an increase in variability (all P ? 0.001) compared to low altitude. Importantly, diurnal to nocturnal altitude differences diminished (P = 0.036), from infancy to childhood, with no further change during adolescence.

Conclusions: physiological adaptation to high-altitude living in native Andeans is unlikely to compensate for the significant differences we observed between diurnal and nocturnal oxyhemoglobin saturation, most marked in infancy. This vulnerability to sleep-related hypoxia in early childhood has potential lifespan implications. Future studies should characterize the sleep- related respiratory physiology underpinning our observations
0161-8105
1001-1008
Hill, Catherine Mary
867cd0a0-dabc-4152-b4bf-8e9fbc0edf8d
Baya, Ana
63ba003f-da24-4977-8a6c-e891c8ed47b3
Gavlak, Johanna
15bfdfeb-374b-4108-86c8-ec0a1dade98e
Carroll, Annette
5e9925c5-7c8c-400f-a426-1576879bfd9e
Heathcote, Kate
411fe403-d854-4759-a0cc-cea97fcff519
Dimitriou, Dagmara
e0254a64-7764-4533-886b-93597d8ca7c9
L'Esperance, Veline
0d44b963-1287-432c-9913-b106064551ce
Webster, Rebecca
0882cf98-333d-428c-9bbf-cdf0fae3d3f2
Holloway, John
4bbd77e6-c095-445d-a36b-a50a72f6fe1a
Virues-Ortega, Javier
a793c487-ea95-40fa-887a-2f45a27c7694
Kirkham, Fenella
1dfbc0d5-aebe-4439-9fb2-dac6503bcd58
Bucks, Romola Starr
16dbcd29-a84d-4573-87ba-0c6468dcef97
Hogan, Alexandra Marie
7b6b2a55-e397-4794-8d1a-fed03862e46b
Hill, Catherine Mary
867cd0a0-dabc-4152-b4bf-8e9fbc0edf8d
Baya, Ana
63ba003f-da24-4977-8a6c-e891c8ed47b3
Gavlak, Johanna
15bfdfeb-374b-4108-86c8-ec0a1dade98e
Carroll, Annette
5e9925c5-7c8c-400f-a426-1576879bfd9e
Heathcote, Kate
411fe403-d854-4759-a0cc-cea97fcff519
Dimitriou, Dagmara
e0254a64-7764-4533-886b-93597d8ca7c9
L'Esperance, Veline
0d44b963-1287-432c-9913-b106064551ce
Webster, Rebecca
0882cf98-333d-428c-9bbf-cdf0fae3d3f2
Holloway, John
4bbd77e6-c095-445d-a36b-a50a72f6fe1a
Virues-Ortega, Javier
a793c487-ea95-40fa-887a-2f45a27c7694
Kirkham, Fenella
1dfbc0d5-aebe-4439-9fb2-dac6503bcd58
Bucks, Romola Starr
16dbcd29-a84d-4573-87ba-0c6468dcef97
Hogan, Alexandra Marie
7b6b2a55-e397-4794-8d1a-fed03862e46b

Hill, Catherine Mary, Baya, Ana, Gavlak, Johanna, Carroll, Annette, Heathcote, Kate, Dimitriou, Dagmara, L'Esperance, Veline, Webster, Rebecca, Holloway, John, Virues-Ortega, Javier, Kirkham, Fenella, Bucks, Romola Starr and Hogan, Alexandra Marie (2016) Adaptation to life in the High Andes: nocturnal oxyhemoglobin saturation in early development. Sleep, 39 (5), 1001-1008. (doi:10.5665/sleep.5740). (PMID:26951394)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Study objectives: physiological adaptation to high altitude hypoxia may be impaired in Andeans with significant European ancestry. The respiratory ‘burden’ of sleep may challenge adaptation, leading to relative nocturnal hypoxia. Developmental aspects of sleep-related breathing in high-altitude native children have not previously been reported. We aimed to determine the influence of development on diurnal-nocturnal oxyhemoglobin differences in children living at high altitude.

Methods: this was a cross-sectional, observational study. Seventy-five healthy Bolivian children aged 6 mo to 17 y, native to low altitude (500 m), moderate high altitude (2,500 m), and high altitude (3,700 m) were recruited. Daytime resting pulse oximetry was compared to overnight recordings using Masimo radical oximeters. Genetic ancestry was determined from DNA samples.

Results: children had mixed European/Amerindian ancestry, with no significant differences between altitudes. Sixty-two participants had ? 5 h of nocturnal, artifact-free data. As predicted, diurnal mean oxyhemoglobin saturation decreased across altitudes (infants and children, both P < 0.001), with lowest diurnal values at high altitude in infants. At high altitude, there was a greater drop in nocturnal mean oxyhemoglobin saturation (infants, P < 0.001; children, P = 0.039) and an increase in variability (all P ? 0.001) compared to low altitude. Importantly, diurnal to nocturnal altitude differences diminished (P = 0.036), from infancy to childhood, with no further change during adolescence.

Conclusions: physiological adaptation to high-altitude living in native Andeans is unlikely to compensate for the significant differences we observed between diurnal and nocturnal oxyhemoglobin saturation, most marked in infancy. This vulnerability to sleep-related hypoxia in early childhood has potential lifespan implications. Future studies should characterize the sleep- related respiratory physiology underpinning our observations

Text
Hill_aasm.39.5.1001.pdf - Version of Record
Download (589kB)
Text
Hill et al_Adaptation to life in the High Andes.pdf - Other
Restricted to Repository staff only
Request a copy

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 22 January 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 29 February 2016
Published date: May 2016
Organisations: Human Development & Health, Clinical & Experimental Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 389765
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/389765
ISSN: 0161-8105
PURE UUID: 992ac859-d006-44f5-b244-07e0fdf78715
ORCID for Catherine Mary Hill: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-2372-5904
ORCID for John Holloway: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9998-0464
ORCID for Fenella Kirkham: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2443-7958

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 14 Mar 2016 16:38
Last modified: 26 Nov 2019 01:57

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Ana Baya
Author: Johanna Gavlak
Author: Annette Carroll
Author: Kate Heathcote
Author: Dagmara Dimitriou
Author: Veline L'Esperance
Author: Rebecca Webster
Author: John Holloway ORCID iD
Author: Javier Virues-Ortega
Author: Fenella Kirkham ORCID iD
Author: Romola Starr Bucks
Author: Alexandra Marie Hogan

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×