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A modelling study of the atmospheric chemistry of DMS using the global model STOCHEM-CRI

A modelling study of the atmospheric chemistry of DMS using the global model STOCHEM-CRI
A modelling study of the atmospheric chemistry of DMS using the global model STOCHEM-CRI
The tropospheric chemistry of dimethylsulfide (DMS) is investigated using a global three-dimensional chemical transport model, STOCHEM with the CRIv2-R5 chemistry scheme. The tropospheric distribution of DMS and its removal at the surface by OH abstraction, OH addition, NO3 oxidation, and BrO oxidation is modelled. The study shows that the lifetime and global burden of DMS is ca. 1.2 days and 98 Gg S, respectively. Inclusion of BrO oxidation resulted in a reduction of the lifetime (1.0 day) and global burden (83 Gg S) of DMS showing that this reaction is important in the DMS budget. The percentage contribution of BrO oxidation to the total removal of DMS is found to be only 7.9% that is considered a lower limit because the study does not include an inorganic source of bromine from sea-salt. BrO oxidation contributed significantly in the high latitudes of the southern hemisphere (SH). Inclusion of DMS removal by Cl2 showed that potentially a large amount of DMS is removed via this reaction specifically in the remote SH oceans, depending on the flux of Cl2 from the Southern Ocean. Model DMS levels are evaluated against measurement data from six different sites around the globe. The model predicted the correct seasonal cycle for DMS at all locations and correlated well with measurement data for most of the periods.
global modelling, global burden, atmospheric lifetime, southern hemisphere, seasonal cycle
1352-2310
69-79
Khan, M.A.H.
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Gillespie, S.M.P.
bb7c0ae3-d2cc-4947-b4a5-495fe9e0af2e
Razis, B.
5477eb26-49ac-4ca1-8aa3-278c099cab2f
Xiao, P.
53fbe4f7-f5b4-4543-8b0d-aed09738fb59
Davies-Coleman, M.T.
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Percival, C.J.
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Derwent, R.G.
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Dyke, J.M.
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Ghosh, M.V.
210ab8df-8389-4bf5-9622-9931cc4a9f81
Lee, E.P.F.
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Shallcross, D.E.
9b36ee5a-feb1-4fea-a34c-f56e64dfae28
Khan, M.A.H.
fde2d950-293a-4989-b1ff-782d416f7f0d
Gillespie, S.M.P.
bb7c0ae3-d2cc-4947-b4a5-495fe9e0af2e
Razis, B.
5477eb26-49ac-4ca1-8aa3-278c099cab2f
Xiao, P.
53fbe4f7-f5b4-4543-8b0d-aed09738fb59
Davies-Coleman, M.T.
6327f27d-ccbe-41ec-895c-33b0821714a3
Percival, C.J.
30c8a344-01f8-4917-a8d2-9d161ddd111d
Derwent, R.G.
3ec2041e-1e18-4b21-a6dd-736f66993e6b
Dyke, J.M.
46393b45-6694-46f3-af20-d7369d26199f
Ghosh, M.V.
210ab8df-8389-4bf5-9622-9931cc4a9f81
Lee, E.P.F.
f47c6d5d-2d1f-4f03-a3ff-03658812d80b
Shallcross, D.E.
9b36ee5a-feb1-4fea-a34c-f56e64dfae28

Khan, M.A.H., Gillespie, S.M.P., Razis, B., Xiao, P., Davies-Coleman, M.T., Percival, C.J., Derwent, R.G., Dyke, J.M., Ghosh, M.V., Lee, E.P.F. and Shallcross, D.E. (2016) A modelling study of the atmospheric chemistry of DMS using the global model STOCHEM-CRI. Atmospheric Environment, 127, 69-79. (doi:10.1016/j.atmosenv.2015.12.028).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The tropospheric chemistry of dimethylsulfide (DMS) is investigated using a global three-dimensional chemical transport model, STOCHEM with the CRIv2-R5 chemistry scheme. The tropospheric distribution of DMS and its removal at the surface by OH abstraction, OH addition, NO3 oxidation, and BrO oxidation is modelled. The study shows that the lifetime and global burden of DMS is ca. 1.2 days and 98 Gg S, respectively. Inclusion of BrO oxidation resulted in a reduction of the lifetime (1.0 day) and global burden (83 Gg S) of DMS showing that this reaction is important in the DMS budget. The percentage contribution of BrO oxidation to the total removal of DMS is found to be only 7.9% that is considered a lower limit because the study does not include an inorganic source of bromine from sea-salt. BrO oxidation contributed significantly in the high latitudes of the southern hemisphere (SH). Inclusion of DMS removal by Cl2 showed that potentially a large amount of DMS is removed via this reaction specifically in the remote SH oceans, depending on the flux of Cl2 from the Southern Ocean. Model DMS levels are evaluated against measurement data from six different sites around the globe. The model predicted the correct seasonal cycle for DMS at all locations and correlated well with measurement data for most of the periods.

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Accepted/In Press date: 12 November 2015
e-pub ahead of print date: 12 December 2015
Published date: February 2016
Keywords: global modelling, global burden, atmospheric lifetime, southern hemisphere, seasonal cycle
Organisations: Chemistry

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 389808
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/389808
ISSN: 1352-2310
PURE UUID: 13a433c6-226b-4835-a3dd-f413843c8bf8
ORCID for J.M. Dyke: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-9808-303X

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Date deposited: 15 Mar 2016 16:29
Last modified: 10 Dec 2019 01:59

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Contributors

Author: M.A.H. Khan
Author: S.M.P. Gillespie
Author: B. Razis
Author: P. Xiao
Author: M.T. Davies-Coleman
Author: C.J. Percival
Author: R.G. Derwent
Author: J.M. Dyke ORCID iD
Author: M.V. Ghosh
Author: E.P.F. Lee
Author: D.E. Shallcross

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