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Low molecular weight components of pollen alter bronchial epithelial barrier functions

Low molecular weight components of pollen alter bronchial epithelial barrier functions
Low molecular weight components of pollen alter bronchial epithelial barrier functions
The bronchial epithelium plays a key role in providing a protective barrier against many environmental substances of anthropogenic or natural origin which enter the lungs during breathing. Appropriate responses to these agents are critical for regulation of tissue homeostasis, while inappropriate responses may contribute to disease pathogenesis. Here, we compared epithelial barrier responses to different pollen species, characterized the active pollen components and the signaling pathways leading to epithelial activation. Polarized bronchial cells were exposed to extracts of timothy grass (Phleum pratense), ragweed (Ambrosia artemisifolia), mugwort (Artemisia vulgaris), birch (Betula alba) and pine (Pinus sylvestris) pollens. All pollen species caused a decrease in ionic permeability as monitored trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TER) and induced polarized release of mediators analyzed by ELISA, with grass pollen showing the highest activity. Ultrafiltration showed that the responses were due to components <3kDa. However, lipid mediators, including phytoprostane E1, had no effect on TER, and caused only modest induction of mediator release. Reverse-phase chromatography separated 2 active fractions: the most hydrophilic maximally affected cytokine release whereas the other only affected TER. Inhibitor studies revealed that JNK played a more dominant role in regulation of barrier permeability in response to grass pollen exposure, whereas ERK and p38 controlled cytokine release. Adenosine and the flavonoid isorhamnetin present in grass pollen contributed to the overall effect on airway epithelial barrier responses. In conclusion, bronchial epithelial barrier functions are differentially affected by several low molecular weight components released by pollen. Furthermore, ionic permeability and innate cytokine production are differentially regulated.
bronchial epithelial barrier, polarized mediator release, pollen, pollen-associated lipid mediator, tight junctions
1-11
Blume, Cornelia
aa391c64-8718-4238-906b-d6bb1551a07b
Swindle, Emily J
fe393c7a-a513-4de4-b02e-27369bd7e84f
Gilles, Stefanie
8f2d5d60-95af-4522-a207-77860cc6b7e3
Traidl-Hoffmann, Claudia
65194201-2f2b-4521-8b2c-ed02ca59ef0b
Davies, Donna E
7de8fdc7-3640-4e3a-aa91-d0e03f990c38
Blume, Cornelia
aa391c64-8718-4238-906b-d6bb1551a07b
Swindle, Emily J
fe393c7a-a513-4de4-b02e-27369bd7e84f
Gilles, Stefanie
8f2d5d60-95af-4522-a207-77860cc6b7e3
Traidl-Hoffmann, Claudia
65194201-2f2b-4521-8b2c-ed02ca59ef0b
Davies, Donna E
7de8fdc7-3640-4e3a-aa91-d0e03f990c38

Blume, Cornelia, Swindle, Emily J, Gilles, Stefanie, Traidl-Hoffmann, Claudia and Davies, Donna E (2015) Low molecular weight components of pollen alter bronchial epithelial barrier functions. Tissue Barriers, 3 (3), 1-11. (doi:10.1080/15476286.2015.1062316). (PMID:26451347)

Record type: Article

Abstract

The bronchial epithelium plays a key role in providing a protective barrier against many environmental substances of anthropogenic or natural origin which enter the lungs during breathing. Appropriate responses to these agents are critical for regulation of tissue homeostasis, while inappropriate responses may contribute to disease pathogenesis. Here, we compared epithelial barrier responses to different pollen species, characterized the active pollen components and the signaling pathways leading to epithelial activation. Polarized bronchial cells were exposed to extracts of timothy grass (Phleum pratense), ragweed (Ambrosia artemisifolia), mugwort (Artemisia vulgaris), birch (Betula alba) and pine (Pinus sylvestris) pollens. All pollen species caused a decrease in ionic permeability as monitored trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TER) and induced polarized release of mediators analyzed by ELISA, with grass pollen showing the highest activity. Ultrafiltration showed that the responses were due to components <3kDa. However, lipid mediators, including phytoprostane E1, had no effect on TER, and caused only modest induction of mediator release. Reverse-phase chromatography separated 2 active fractions: the most hydrophilic maximally affected cytokine release whereas the other only affected TER. Inhibitor studies revealed that JNK played a more dominant role in regulation of barrier permeability in response to grass pollen exposure, whereas ERK and p38 controlled cytokine release. Adenosine and the flavonoid isorhamnetin present in grass pollen contributed to the overall effect on airway epithelial barrier responses. In conclusion, bronchial epithelial barrier functions are differentially affected by several low molecular weight components released by pollen. Furthermore, ionic permeability and innate cytokine production are differentially regulated.

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Accepted/In Press date: 19 May 2015
Published date: July 2015
Keywords: bronchial epithelial barrier, polarized mediator release, pollen, pollen-associated lipid mediator, tight junctions
Organisations: Clinical & Experimental Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 389843
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/389843
PURE UUID: 696e7c81-d267-4108-a8a4-7b1ea71b9cd8
ORCID for Cornelia Blume: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-6133-7318
ORCID for Emily J Swindle: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3644-7747
ORCID for Donna E Davies: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5117-2991

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Date deposited: 16 Mar 2016 15:07
Last modified: 24 May 2019 00:40

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Contributors

Author: Cornelia Blume ORCID iD
Author: Emily J Swindle ORCID iD
Author: Stefanie Gilles
Author: Claudia Traidl-Hoffmann
Author: Donna E Davies ORCID iD

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