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Westminster in small states: comparing the Caribbean and Pacific experience

Westminster in small states: comparing the Caribbean and Pacific experience
Westminster in small states: comparing the Caribbean and Pacific experience
Small states, and those in the Caribbean and Pacific regions in particular, are among the most stubbornly and disproportionally democratic countries in the world. And yet, they are rarely studied comparatively, despite sharing seemingly obvious similarities aside from being small island states with developing economies they also tend to share a British colonial heritage and Westminster- inspired political institutions. This omission is all the more puzzling if we consider that the group does not conform to the standard battery of explanations developed by democratization theorists. To pave the way for further research across these two regions, this article provides a synoptic comparison of the process of democratization in Caribbean and Pacific small states. We highlight important similarities and differences that stem from the interaction between formal institutions and informal practices. We conclude by reiterating the benefits for scholars of democratization by looking at these significant yet hitherto rarely compared cases.
democratization, westminster, small states, pacific, caribbean
1356-9775
1-32
Corbett, Jack
ad651655-ac70-4072-a36f-92165e296ce2
Veenendaal, Wouter
230cf0c6-70cb-465d-8664-2ec9798bcdb0
Corbett, Jack
ad651655-ac70-4072-a36f-92165e296ce2
Veenendaal, Wouter
230cf0c6-70cb-465d-8664-2ec9798bcdb0

Corbett, Jack and Veenendaal, Wouter (2016) Westminster in small states: comparing the Caribbean and Pacific experience. Contemporary Politics, (inpress), 1-32. (doi:10.1080/13569775.2016.1175096).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Small states, and those in the Caribbean and Pacific regions in particular, are among the most stubbornly and disproportionally democratic countries in the world. And yet, they are rarely studied comparatively, despite sharing seemingly obvious similarities aside from being small island states with developing economies they also tend to share a British colonial heritage and Westminster- inspired political institutions. This omission is all the more puzzling if we consider that the group does not conform to the standard battery of explanations developed by democratization theorists. To pave the way for further research across these two regions, this article provides a synoptic comparison of the process of democratization in Caribbean and Pacific small states. We highlight important similarities and differences that stem from the interaction between formal institutions and informal practices. We conclude by reiterating the benefits for scholars of democratization by looking at these significant yet hitherto rarely compared cases.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 23 February 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 30 April 2016
Keywords: democratization, westminster, small states, pacific, caribbean
Organisations: Politics & International Relations

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 390011
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/390011
ISSN: 1356-9775
PURE UUID: c58490b0-0722-404d-b2dc-3715317a9c8e
ORCID for Jack Corbett: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-2005-7162

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 17 Mar 2016 11:27
Last modified: 10 Jan 2022 03:04

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Contributors

Author: Jack Corbett ORCID iD
Author: Wouter Veenendaal

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