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Data from Investigation and Improvement of the Dispenser Printing of Electrical Interconnections for Smart Fabric Applications

Data from Investigation and Improvement of the Dispenser Printing of Electrical Interconnections for Smart Fabric Applications
Data from Investigation and Improvement of the Dispenser Printing of Electrical Interconnections for Smart Fabric Applications
This data underlies the paper ‘Investigation and Improvement of the Dispenser Printing of Electrical Interconnections for Smart Fabric Applications’ published in ‘Smart Materials and Structures’. Electrical interconnections are essential for the integration of electronic functions in a fabric. These interconnects can be dispenser printed on a fabric; however printing directly on a breathable woven fabric surface is challenging due to the high surface variation and porosity defined by the weave. This paper shows that fabric surface variation leads to inconsistent printed structures which adversely affects the electrical properties of printed conductive tracks. It uses a novel thermal imaging based method for resistance distribution analysis of the printed conductive tracks. This paper also investigates a solution of overcoming the fabric variation in the form of dispenser printing an interface layer between the conductive ink and the fabric surface. Four dielectric inks DuPont 5018, Electra EFV4/4965, Fabinks-UV-IF-1004 and Fabinks-UV-TC0233, evaluated in this paper as interface materials, reduce the fabric surface variation by more than 95%. Conductive tracks, dispenser printed on the four interface materials, produced ?90% reduction of electrical resistivity compared to tracks printed directly on the fabric. Tracks using this method produced similar resistivity to dispenser printed tracks on Kapton, a traditional printed electronic substrate. Details of dispenser printing of interface materials reported in this paper can be used for the fabrication of uniform electronic layers in smart fabric applications.
University of Southampton
Ahmed, Zeeshan
4f45182b-d376-48be-840d-6d15fef75ff1
Torah, Russel
7147b47b-db01-4124-95dc-90d6a9842688
Yang, Kai
f1c9b81d-e821-47eb-a69e-b3bc419de9c7
Beeby, Stephen
ba565001-2812-4300-89f1-fe5a437ecb0d
Tudor, Michael
46eea408-2246-4aa0-8b44-86169ed601ff
Ahmed, Zeeshan
4f45182b-d376-48be-840d-6d15fef75ff1
Torah, Russel
7147b47b-db01-4124-95dc-90d6a9842688
Yang, Kai
f1c9b81d-e821-47eb-a69e-b3bc419de9c7
Beeby, Stephen
ba565001-2812-4300-89f1-fe5a437ecb0d
Tudor, Michael
46eea408-2246-4aa0-8b44-86169ed601ff

Ahmed, Zeeshan, Torah, Russel, Yang, Kai, Beeby, Stephen and Tudor, Michael (2016) Data from Investigation and Improvement of the Dispenser Printing of Electrical Interconnections for Smart Fabric Applications University of Southampton doi:10.5258/SOTON/390074 [Dataset]

Record type: Dataset

Abstract

This data underlies the paper ‘Investigation and Improvement of the Dispenser Printing of Electrical Interconnections for Smart Fabric Applications’ published in ‘Smart Materials and Structures’. Electrical interconnections are essential for the integration of electronic functions in a fabric. These interconnects can be dispenser printed on a fabric; however printing directly on a breathable woven fabric surface is challenging due to the high surface variation and porosity defined by the weave. This paper shows that fabric surface variation leads to inconsistent printed structures which adversely affects the electrical properties of printed conductive tracks. It uses a novel thermal imaging based method for resistance distribution analysis of the printed conductive tracks. This paper also investigates a solution of overcoming the fabric variation in the form of dispenser printing an interface layer between the conductive ink and the fabric surface. Four dielectric inks DuPont 5018, Electra EFV4/4965, Fabinks-UV-IF-1004 and Fabinks-UV-TC0233, evaluated in this paper as interface materials, reduce the fabric surface variation by more than 95%. Conductive tracks, dispenser printed on the four interface materials, produced ?90% reduction of electrical resistivity compared to tracks printed directly on the fabric. Tracks using this method produced similar resistivity to dispenser printed tracks on Kapton, a traditional printed electronic substrate. Details of dispenser printing of interface materials reported in this paper can be used for the fabrication of uniform electronic layers in smart fabric applications.

Other Data_20from_20Investigation_20and_20Improvement_20of_20the_20Dispenser_20Printing_20of_20Electrical_20Interconnections_20for_20Smart_20Fabric_20Applications.xlsx - Dataset
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More information

Published date: 2016
Organisations: Electronics & Computer Science, EEE
Projects:
Digital creative tools for digital printing of smart fabrics (CREATIF)
Funded by: UNSPECIFIED (610414)
1 October 2013 to 30 September 2016

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 390074
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/390074
PURE UUID: bba80cff-1042-4677-89f2-9078682dd8c6
ORCID for Stephen Beeby: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-0800-1759

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 10 Aug 2016 13:15
Last modified: 19 Jul 2017 01:09

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Contributors

Creator: Zeeshan Ahmed
Creator: Russel Torah
Creator: Kai Yang
Creator: Stephen Beeby ORCID iD
Creator: Michael Tudor

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