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Patterns of ranibizumab and aflibercept treatment of central retinal vein occlusion in routine clinical practice in the USA

Patterns of ranibizumab and aflibercept treatment of central retinal vein occlusion in routine clinical practice in the USA
Patterns of ranibizumab and aflibercept treatment of central retinal vein occlusion in routine clinical practice in the USA
Background: The intravitreal anti-vascular endothelial growth factor treatments ranibizumab and aflibercept have proven efficacy in clinical trials, but their real world usage in central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) has not been assessed. We therefore evaluated the treatment patterns of both drugs in a US claims database.

Methods: The IMS Integrated Data Warehouse was used to identify the patients with CRVO in the USA with claims for ranibizumab or aflibercept between 24 September 2012 and 31 March 2014 with at least 12 months follow-up. Patients were required to have had no anti-VEGF treatment code for 6 months before index (‘treatment-naive’). Mean numbers of injections and non-injection visits to a treating physician were compared with patients receiving these treatments.

Results: Patient characteristics were similar for patients receiving ranibizumab (n=206) or aflibercept (n=79) at index. The mean (±SD) numbers of injections received by patients treated with ranibizumab or aflibercept were 4.4±2.8 and 4.7±2.9 (P=0.38), respectively; the total number of patient visits to their treating physician was 7.3±3.7 and 7.0±2.9 (P=0.52), respectively. For patients receiving one or more injections (n=238), the mean interval between injections was 55.1 days (ranibizumab) and 54.2 days (aflibercept; P=0.44).

Conclusions: Our results suggest that, in routine clinical practice, patients receive a comparable number of injections in the first year of treatment with ranibizumab or aflibercept. This may have implications for commissioning and service development of CRVO care pathways.
0950-222X
380-387
Lotery, A.J.
5ecc2d2d-d0b4-468f-ad2c-df7156f8e514
Regnier, S.
3f10257e-8ea4-4c80-ab4a-d54824c0605a
Lotery, A.J.
5ecc2d2d-d0b4-468f-ad2c-df7156f8e514
Regnier, S.
3f10257e-8ea4-4c80-ab4a-d54824c0605a

Lotery, A.J. and Regnier, S. (2015) Patterns of ranibizumab and aflibercept treatment of central retinal vein occlusion in routine clinical practice in the USA. Eye, 29 (3), 380-387. (doi:10.1038/eye.2014.308). (PMID:25572584)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: The intravitreal anti-vascular endothelial growth factor treatments ranibizumab and aflibercept have proven efficacy in clinical trials, but their real world usage in central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) has not been assessed. We therefore evaluated the treatment patterns of both drugs in a US claims database.

Methods: The IMS Integrated Data Warehouse was used to identify the patients with CRVO in the USA with claims for ranibizumab or aflibercept between 24 September 2012 and 31 March 2014 with at least 12 months follow-up. Patients were required to have had no anti-VEGF treatment code for 6 months before index (‘treatment-naive’). Mean numbers of injections and non-injection visits to a treating physician were compared with patients receiving these treatments.

Results: Patient characteristics were similar for patients receiving ranibizumab (n=206) or aflibercept (n=79) at index. The mean (±SD) numbers of injections received by patients treated with ranibizumab or aflibercept were 4.4±2.8 and 4.7±2.9 (P=0.38), respectively; the total number of patient visits to their treating physician was 7.3±3.7 and 7.0±2.9 (P=0.52), respectively. For patients receiving one or more injections (n=238), the mean interval between injections was 55.1 days (ranibizumab) and 54.2 days (aflibercept; P=0.44).

Conclusions: Our results suggest that, in routine clinical practice, patients receive a comparable number of injections in the first year of treatment with ranibizumab or aflibercept. This may have implications for commissioning and service development of CRVO care pathways.

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Accepted/In Press date: 25 November 2014
e-pub ahead of print date: 9 January 2015
Published date: 29 March 2015
Organisations: Faculty of Medicine

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 390420
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/390420
ISSN: 0950-222X
PURE UUID: 06e1fc3d-80e0-4e95-8252-fe59b30d8f33
ORCID for A.J. Lotery: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5541-4305

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Date deposited: 01 Apr 2016 13:11
Last modified: 03 Dec 2019 01:50

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Author: A.J. Lotery ORCID iD
Author: S. Regnier

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