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A comparison of state traditions and the revival of a nuclear power in four countries

A comparison of state traditions and the revival of a nuclear power in four countries
A comparison of state traditions and the revival of a nuclear power in four countries
The British, American, French and Finnish governments are seeking to promote investment in a new generation of nuclear power plants. Nuclear power programmes are delivered through networks of international companies through which government must manage. This is consistent with the concept of governance. Governments can advance their policy goals by using a variety of policy instruments to shape and organize governance networks. This is known as metagovernance. The paper considers the extent to which the selection and deployment of the policy instruments used to metagovern is informed by the prevailing tradition of government. The paper examines how the British, American, French and Finnish governments have tried to metagovern. It is shown that whilst governing traditions do inform the selection and deployment of the policy instruments used to metagovern, the composition of the network, and the nature of the policy problem also plays a role in shaping government action.
nuclear power, comparative policy, governance, metagovernance, policy implementation
1387-6988
140-156
Baker, Keith
3babd258-7c3f-4a11-b64b-8c1202205fb7
Stoker, Gerry
209ba619-6a65-4bc1-9235-cba0d826bfd9
Baker, Keith
3babd258-7c3f-4a11-b64b-8c1202205fb7
Stoker, Gerry
209ba619-6a65-4bc1-9235-cba0d826bfd9

Baker, Keith and Stoker, Gerry (2015) A comparison of state traditions and the revival of a nuclear power in four countries. [in special issue: Comparative Implementation Research ] Journal of Comparative Policy Analysis: Research and Practice, 17 (2), 140-156. (doi:10.1080/13876988.2014.889901).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The British, American, French and Finnish governments are seeking to promote investment in a new generation of nuclear power plants. Nuclear power programmes are delivered through networks of international companies through which government must manage. This is consistent with the concept of governance. Governments can advance their policy goals by using a variety of policy instruments to shape and organize governance networks. This is known as metagovernance. The paper considers the extent to which the selection and deployment of the policy instruments used to metagovern is informed by the prevailing tradition of government. The paper examines how the British, American, French and Finnish governments have tried to metagovern. It is shown that whilst governing traditions do inform the selection and deployment of the policy instruments used to metagovern, the composition of the network, and the nature of the policy problem also plays a role in shaping government action.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 1 September 2013
e-pub ahead of print date: 30 April 2014
Published date: 2015
Keywords: nuclear power, comparative policy, governance, metagovernance, policy implementation
Organisations: Social Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 390464
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/390464
ISSN: 1387-6988
PURE UUID: daab7eff-5a0e-450f-be8e-eee12c44c0c0

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 04 Apr 2016 08:37
Last modified: 15 Jul 2019 20:39

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