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Thatcher’s Children, Blair’s Babies, political socialisation and trickle-down value-change: an age, period and cohort analysis

Thatcher’s Children, Blair’s Babies, political socialisation and trickle-down value-change: an age, period and cohort analysis
Thatcher’s Children, Blair’s Babies, political socialisation and trickle-down value-change: an age, period and cohort analysis
To what extent are new generations ‘Thatcherite’? Using British Social Attitudes data for 1985-2012 and applying age-period-cohort (APC) analysis and generalized additive models (GAMs) this article investigates whether Thatcher’s Children hold more right-authoritarian political values compared to other political generations. The study further examine the extent to which the generation that came of age under New Labour – Blair’s Babies – share these values. The findings for generation effects indicate that this political generation is even more right-authoritarian, including with respect to attitudes to redistribution, welfare and crime. This view is supported by evidence of cohort effects. These results show that the legacy of Thatcherism for left-right and libertarian-authoritarian values is its long-term shaping of public opinion through political socialisation.
0007-1234
17-36
Grasso, Maria Teresa
8b784ede-8f40-46ab-bf42-961f88191392
Farrall, Stephen
c0bf4481-60fd-46f3-bc13-114bf4e58dd3
Gray, Emily
04ff194d-9985-4638-b702-751948aa5f25
Hay, Colin
1dc2c1eb-c9bc-4f6a-ad7a-aa0038689217
Jennings, Will
2ab3f11c-eb7f-44c6-9ef2-3180c1a954f7
Grasso, Maria Teresa
8b784ede-8f40-46ab-bf42-961f88191392
Farrall, Stephen
c0bf4481-60fd-46f3-bc13-114bf4e58dd3
Gray, Emily
04ff194d-9985-4638-b702-751948aa5f25
Hay, Colin
1dc2c1eb-c9bc-4f6a-ad7a-aa0038689217
Jennings, Will
2ab3f11c-eb7f-44c6-9ef2-3180c1a954f7

Grasso, Maria Teresa, Farrall, Stephen, Gray, Emily, Hay, Colin and Jennings, Will (2019) Thatcher’s Children, Blair’s Babies, political socialisation and trickle-down value-change: an age, period and cohort analysis. British Journal of Political Science, 49 (1), 17-36. (doi:10.1017/S0007123416000375).

Record type: Article

Abstract

To what extent are new generations ‘Thatcherite’? Using British Social Attitudes data for 1985-2012 and applying age-period-cohort (APC) analysis and generalized additive models (GAMs) this article investigates whether Thatcher’s Children hold more right-authoritarian political values compared to other political generations. The study further examine the extent to which the generation that came of age under New Labour – Blair’s Babies – share these values. The findings for generation effects indicate that this political generation is even more right-authoritarian, including with respect to attitudes to redistribution, welfare and crime. This view is supported by evidence of cohort effects. These results show that the legacy of Thatcherism for left-right and libertarian-authoritarian values is its long-term shaping of public opinion through political socialisation.

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Accepted/In Press date: 21 March 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 26 January 2017
Published date: January 2019
Organisations: Politics & International Relations

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Local EPrints ID: 390558
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/390558
ISSN: 0007-1234
PURE UUID: 48439e3a-e991-4b9e-8d1c-c40674499ddb
ORCID for Will Jennings: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9007-8896

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Date deposited: 11 Apr 2016 13:53
Last modified: 23 Jul 2022 02:04

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Contributors

Author: Maria Teresa Grasso
Author: Stephen Farrall
Author: Emily Gray
Author: Colin Hay
Author: Will Jennings ORCID iD

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