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Experimental evaluation of model predictive current control of a five-phase induction motor using all switching states

Experimental evaluation of model predictive current control of a five-phase induction motor using all switching states
Experimental evaluation of model predictive current control of a five-phase induction motor using all switching states
This paper presents a flux and torque control scheme, based on finite-control-set model predictive control (FCS-MPC), for two three-phase induction motors supplied by a five-leg two-level inverter. The reduced-switch-count topology with leg sharing inherently imposes an additional constraint on the voltages in the system. In the best available PWM-based control scheme for this topology, the constraint means that, in simple terms, the sum of speeds of two machines cannot exceed the rated speed of one machine, in order to avoid over-modulation and large torque oscillations. In essence, no provision exists to account for the additional voltage limit of the topology. It will be shown here that the FCS-MPC can consider the voltage constraint dynamically in the control loop, and hence, apart from preserving the independent control of the two machines, it can significantly widen the speed operating range. Three different cost functions, corresponding to three operating modes, are considered. The unique way in which the MPC handles tracking errors allows the motors to operate dynamically in the base speed region with field weakening, without requiring any external change of the flux references. Simulation and preliminary experimental results verify the theory.
electric current control, induction motors, machine control, optimisation, predictive control, rotors, stators, d-q flux/torque, finite-control-set model predictive control, five-phase induction motor, nonflux/torque, optimization process, phase current ripple, predictive current control, primary plane, reference frame, rotor flux, secondary plane, stator fundamental frequency, switching states, winding losses, x-y current components, Cost function, Induction motors, Inverters, Rotors, Stators, Switches, Torque, Predictive control, current control, multiphase drives
Lim, Chee Shen
616d0697-a5d5-4079-adaa-6686e5a758fe
Levi, E.
068c5db6-2328-46b5-aa66-92f6502375fc
Jones, M.
cf34ab48-f4e0-40d8-9ce5-8f3b9cfe236e
Rahim, N. Abdul
b3969aeb-a604-4780-afa4-a7b0a14683a6
Hew, W.P.
a23d7286-140c-44cc-84fc-5e78a97dc062
Lim, Chee Shen
616d0697-a5d5-4079-adaa-6686e5a758fe
Levi, E.
068c5db6-2328-46b5-aa66-92f6502375fc
Jones, M.
cf34ab48-f4e0-40d8-9ce5-8f3b9cfe236e
Rahim, N. Abdul
b3969aeb-a604-4780-afa4-a7b0a14683a6
Hew, W.P.
a23d7286-140c-44cc-84fc-5e78a97dc062

Lim, Chee Shen, Levi, E., Jones, M., Rahim, N. Abdul and Hew, W.P. (2012) Experimental evaluation of model predictive current control of a five-phase induction motor using all switching states. 15th International Power Electronics and Motion Control Conference EPE-PEMC), Novi Sad, Serbia. 03 - 05 Sep 2012. (doi:10.1109/EPEPEMC.2012.6397394).

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

This paper presents a flux and torque control scheme, based on finite-control-set model predictive control (FCS-MPC), for two three-phase induction motors supplied by a five-leg two-level inverter. The reduced-switch-count topology with leg sharing inherently imposes an additional constraint on the voltages in the system. In the best available PWM-based control scheme for this topology, the constraint means that, in simple terms, the sum of speeds of two machines cannot exceed the rated speed of one machine, in order to avoid over-modulation and large torque oscillations. In essence, no provision exists to account for the additional voltage limit of the topology. It will be shown here that the FCS-MPC can consider the voltage constraint dynamically in the control loop, and hence, apart from preserving the independent control of the two machines, it can significantly widen the speed operating range. Three different cost functions, corresponding to three operating modes, are considered. The unique way in which the MPC handles tracking errors allows the motors to operate dynamically in the base speed region with field weakening, without requiring any external change of the flux references. Simulation and preliminary experimental results verify the theory.

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 4 September 2012
Venue - Dates: 15th International Power Electronics and Motion Control Conference EPE-PEMC), Novi Sad, Serbia, 2012-09-03 - 2012-09-05
Keywords: electric current control, induction motors, machine control, optimisation, predictive control, rotors, stators, d-q flux/torque, finite-control-set model predictive control, five-phase induction motor, nonflux/torque, optimization process, phase current ripple, predictive current control, primary plane, reference frame, rotor flux, secondary plane, stator fundamental frequency, switching states, winding losses, x-y current components, Cost function, Induction motors, Inverters, Rotors, Stators, Switches, Torque, Predictive control, current control, multiphase drives
Organisations: EEE

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 390577
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/390577
PURE UUID: 0f62569a-e54c-4417-bc23-a94a80727c57

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Date deposited: 19 Apr 2016 10:47
Last modified: 12 Aug 2020 16:32

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Contributors

Author: Chee Shen Lim
Author: E. Levi
Author: M. Jones
Author: N. Abdul Rahim
Author: W.P. Hew

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