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Factors affecting sound exposure from firing an SA80 high-velocity rifle

Factors affecting sound exposure from firing an SA80 high-velocity rifle
Factors affecting sound exposure from firing an SA80 high-velocity rifle
The effect of distance on the peak sound pressure level and sound exposure level from an SA80 rifle has been investigated. Sound pressure waveforms were measured in two directions from the gun: downrange, from 50 m to 300 m, and to the left-hand side, from 0.3 m to 32 m. Some additional measurements were made to the right of the gun. Measurements made downrange showed three distinct features of the waveform; the shock wave from the supersonic bullet, the reflection from the ground, and the muzzle blast. The time elapsed between the shock wave and the muzzle blast increased with increasing distance: 94 ms for a distance of 50 m, and 507 ms for a distance of 300 m. The highest peak sound level downrange from a single round was between 151 dB(C) and 148 dB(C) at distances from 50 m to 300 m, and varied little if at all with distance. To the left of the gun, the peak sound pressure level of 161 dB(C) at 0.3 m reduced to 128 dB(C) at 32 m. The peak sound pressure level was estimated to be 137 dB(C) at a distance of approximately 20 m to the left-hand side. Hearing protection must therefore be worn by anyone closer than 20 m to a person firing. The peak sound pressure level was estimated to be 135 dB(C) at a distance of approximately 25 m and therefore hearing protection is recommended at distances of up to 25 m. The sound exposure level of 98 dB(A) at 20 m indicated that an observer at this distance could hear about 1440 rounds without hearing protection before the noise exposure reached the upper exposure action value specified in the Control of Noise at Work Regulations 2005. Peak sound pressure levels were on average 2.4 dB higher at the left ear compared with the right ear.
noise, rifle, shock wave, muzzle blast, hearing protection, localisation
0003-682X
61-68
Paddan, Gurmail S.
d019df32-1de8-4ecf-976e-61791661ef13
Lower, Michael
301d090f-87a2-488f-81e4-7b2a6756e5d8
Paddan, Gurmail S.
d019df32-1de8-4ecf-976e-61791661ef13
Lower, Michael
301d090f-87a2-488f-81e4-7b2a6756e5d8

Paddan, Gurmail S. and Lower, Michael (2016) Factors affecting sound exposure from firing an SA80 high-velocity rifle. Applied Acoustics, 109, 61-68. (doi:10.1016/j.apacoust.2016.02.003).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The effect of distance on the peak sound pressure level and sound exposure level from an SA80 rifle has been investigated. Sound pressure waveforms were measured in two directions from the gun: downrange, from 50 m to 300 m, and to the left-hand side, from 0.3 m to 32 m. Some additional measurements were made to the right of the gun. Measurements made downrange showed three distinct features of the waveform; the shock wave from the supersonic bullet, the reflection from the ground, and the muzzle blast. The time elapsed between the shock wave and the muzzle blast increased with increasing distance: 94 ms for a distance of 50 m, and 507 ms for a distance of 300 m. The highest peak sound level downrange from a single round was between 151 dB(C) and 148 dB(C) at distances from 50 m to 300 m, and varied little if at all with distance. To the left of the gun, the peak sound pressure level of 161 dB(C) at 0.3 m reduced to 128 dB(C) at 32 m. The peak sound pressure level was estimated to be 137 dB(C) at a distance of approximately 20 m to the left-hand side. Hearing protection must therefore be worn by anyone closer than 20 m to a person firing. The peak sound pressure level was estimated to be 135 dB(C) at a distance of approximately 25 m and therefore hearing protection is recommended at distances of up to 25 m. The sound exposure level of 98 dB(A) at 20 m indicated that an observer at this distance could hear about 1440 rounds without hearing protection before the noise exposure reached the upper exposure action value specified in the Control of Noise at Work Regulations 2005. Peak sound pressure levels were on average 2.4 dB higher at the left ear compared with the right ear.

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SA80manuscript-3 - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 25 February 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 21 March 2016
Published date: August 2016
Keywords: noise, rifle, shock wave, muzzle blast, hearing protection, localisation
Organisations: Inst. Sound & Vibration Research

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 390601
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/390601
ISSN: 0003-682X
PURE UUID: 192ee0f1-5190-43ec-b6e7-aa1befff2ce7

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Date deposited: 31 Mar 2016 12:00
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 06:22

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Contributors

Author: Gurmail S. Paddan
Author: Michael Lower

University divisions

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