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Higher body fat percentage is associated with enhanced temperature perception in NAFLD: results from the randomised Wessex Evaluation of fatty Liver and Cardiovascular markers in NAFLD with OMacor thErapy trial (WELCOME) trial

Higher body fat percentage is associated with enhanced temperature perception in NAFLD: results from the randomised Wessex Evaluation of fatty Liver and Cardiovascular markers in NAFLD with OMacor thErapy trial (WELCOME) trial
Higher body fat percentage is associated with enhanced temperature perception in NAFLD: results from the randomised Wessex Evaluation of fatty Liver and Cardiovascular markers in NAFLD with OMacor thErapy trial (WELCOME) trial
Aims/hypothesis

The effect of n-3 fatty acid treatment on temperature perception as a sensory nerve function modality is uncertain. In patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) both with and without type 2 diabetes, we: (1) tested whether 15–18 months’ treatment with 4 g/day of docosahexaenoic plus eicosapentaenoic acid (DHA+EPA) improved hot (HPT) and cold (CPT) temperature perception thresholds and (2) explored factors associated with HPT and CPT, in a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

Methods

The effect of treatment (n=44) on HPT, CPT and temperature perception index (TPI: difference between HPT and CPT) was measured at the big toe in 90 individuals without neuropathy (type 2 diabetes; n=30). Participants were randomised 1:1, using sequential numbering, by personnel independent from the trial team. All participants and all members of the research team were blinded to group assignment. Data were collected in the Southampton National Institute for Health Research Biomedical Research Centre. Treatment effects and the independence of associations were testing by regression modelling.

Results

Mean±SD age was 50.9±10.6 years. In men (n=53) and women (n=37), HPTs (°C) were 46.1±5.1 and 43.1±6.4 (p=0.02), CPTs (°C) were 22.7±3.4 and 24.5±3.6 (p=0.07) and TPIs (°C) were 23.4±7.4 and 18.7±9.5 (p=0.008), respectively. In univariate analyses, total body fat percentage (measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry [DXA]) was associated with HPT (r=–0.36 p=0.001), CPT (r=0.35 p=0.001) and TPI (r=0.39 p=0.0001). In multivariable-adjusted regression models, adjusting for age, sex and other potential confounders, only body fat percentage was independently associated with HPT, CPT or TPI (p=0.006, p=0.006 and p=0.002, respectively). DHA+EPA treatment did not modify HPT, CPT or TPI (p=0.93, p=0.44 and p=0.67, respectively). There were no important adverse effects or side effects reported.

Conclusions/interpretation

Higher body fat percentage is associated with enhanced temperature perception. There was no benefit of treatment with high-dose n-3 fatty acids on the thresholds to detect hot or cold stimuli.
Trial registration:

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00760513
0012-186X
1422-1429
Clough, Geraldine
9f19639e-a929-4976-ac35-259f9011c494
McCormick, Keith
95d56eea-74aa-4b48-b950-ab8207e57d08
Scorletti, Eleonora
42bb0659-ac67-4a73-bf36-a881fe6c1563
Bhatia, Lokpal
41232d21-eef2-43a9-a129-994b81ccedaf
Calder, Philip
1797e54f-378e-4dcb-80a4-3e30018f07a6
Griffin, Michael
24112494-9774-40cb-91b7-5b4afe3c41b8
Byrne, Christopher
1370b997-cead-4229-83a7-53301ed2a43c
Clough, Geraldine
9f19639e-a929-4976-ac35-259f9011c494
McCormick, Keith
95d56eea-74aa-4b48-b950-ab8207e57d08
Scorletti, Eleonora
42bb0659-ac67-4a73-bf36-a881fe6c1563
Bhatia, Lokpal
41232d21-eef2-43a9-a129-994b81ccedaf
Calder, Philip
1797e54f-378e-4dcb-80a4-3e30018f07a6
Griffin, Michael
24112494-9774-40cb-91b7-5b4afe3c41b8
Byrne, Christopher
1370b997-cead-4229-83a7-53301ed2a43c

Clough, Geraldine, McCormick, Keith, Scorletti, Eleonora, Bhatia, Lokpal, Calder, Philip, Griffin, Michael and Byrne, Christopher (2016) Higher body fat percentage is associated with enhanced temperature perception in NAFLD: results from the randomised Wessex Evaluation of fatty Liver and Cardiovascular markers in NAFLD with OMacor thErapy trial (WELCOME) trial. Diabetologia, 59 (7), 1422-1429. (doi:10.1007/s00125-016-3966-8). (PMID:27106721)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Aims/hypothesis

The effect of n-3 fatty acid treatment on temperature perception as a sensory nerve function modality is uncertain. In patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) both with and without type 2 diabetes, we: (1) tested whether 15–18 months’ treatment with 4 g/day of docosahexaenoic plus eicosapentaenoic acid (DHA+EPA) improved hot (HPT) and cold (CPT) temperature perception thresholds and (2) explored factors associated with HPT and CPT, in a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

Methods

The effect of treatment (n=44) on HPT, CPT and temperature perception index (TPI: difference between HPT and CPT) was measured at the big toe in 90 individuals without neuropathy (type 2 diabetes; n=30). Participants were randomised 1:1, using sequential numbering, by personnel independent from the trial team. All participants and all members of the research team were blinded to group assignment. Data were collected in the Southampton National Institute for Health Research Biomedical Research Centre. Treatment effects and the independence of associations were testing by regression modelling.

Results

Mean±SD age was 50.9±10.6 years. In men (n=53) and women (n=37), HPTs (°C) were 46.1±5.1 and 43.1±6.4 (p=0.02), CPTs (°C) were 22.7±3.4 and 24.5±3.6 (p=0.07) and TPIs (°C) were 23.4±7.4 and 18.7±9.5 (p=0.008), respectively. In univariate analyses, total body fat percentage (measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry [DXA]) was associated with HPT (r=–0.36 p=0.001), CPT (r=0.35 p=0.001) and TPI (r=0.39 p=0.0001). In multivariable-adjusted regression models, adjusting for age, sex and other potential confounders, only body fat percentage was independently associated with HPT, CPT or TPI (p=0.006, p=0.006 and p=0.002, respectively). DHA+EPA treatment did not modify HPT, CPT or TPI (p=0.93, p=0.44 and p=0.67, respectively). There were no important adverse effects or side effects reported.

Conclusions/interpretation

Higher body fat percentage is associated with enhanced temperature perception. There was no benefit of treatment with high-dose n-3 fatty acids on the thresholds to detect hot or cold stimuli.
Trial registration:

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00760513

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Diabetologia_GC_CDTB et al_ April 2016_Diab-16-0115_accepted_010416.pdf - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 1 April 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 22 April 2016
Published date: July 2016
Organisations: Faculty of Health Sciences, Human Development & Health

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 390733
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/390733
ISSN: 0012-186X
PURE UUID: 0bdf0fb5-d00e-4c42-99d8-8c07095e6e1b
ORCID for Geraldine Clough: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6226-8964
ORCID for Michael Griffin: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0743-9502
ORCID for Christopher Byrne: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-6322-7753

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 06 Apr 2016 14:55
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 06:53

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Contributors

Author: Keith McCormick
Author: Eleonora Scorletti
Author: Lokpal Bhatia
Author: Philip Calder
Author: Michael Griffin ORCID iD

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