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Lack of involvement of Fenton chemistry in death of methicillin-resistant and methicillin-sensitive strains of Staphylococcus aureus and destruction of their genomes on wet or dry copper alloy surfaces

Lack of involvement of Fenton chemistry in death of methicillin-resistant and methicillin-sensitive strains of Staphylococcus aureus and destruction of their genomes on wet or dry copper alloy surfaces
Lack of involvement of Fenton chemistry in death of methicillin-resistant and methicillin-sensitive strains of Staphylococcus aureus and destruction of their genomes on wet or dry copper alloy surfaces
The pandemic of hospital-acquired infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has declined, but the evolution of strains with enhanced virulence and toxins and the increase of community-associated infections are still a threat. In previous studies, 107 MRSA bacteria applied as simulated droplet contamination were killed on copper and brass surfaces within 90 min. However, contamination of surfaces is often via finger tips and dries rapidly, and it may be overlooked by cleaning regimes (unlike visible droplets). In this new study, a 5-log reduction of a hardy epidemic strain of MRSA (epidemic methicillin-resistant S. aureus 16 [EMRSA-16]) was observed following 10 min of contact with copper,
and a 4-log reduction was observed on copper nickel and cartridge brass alloys in 15 min. A methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) strain from an osteomyelitis patient was killed on copper surfaces in 15 min, and 4-log and 3-log reductions occurred within 20 min of contact with copper nickel and cartridge brass, respectively. Bacterial respiration was compromised on copper surfaces, and superoxide was generated as part of the killing mechanism. In addition, destruction of genomic DNA occurs on copper and brass surfaces, allaying concerns about horizontal gene transfer and copper resistance. Incorporation of copper alloy biocidal surfaces may help to reduce the spread of this dangerous pathogen.
0099-2240
2132-2136
Warnes, Sarah
f724f4bf-86cf-4b7b-bf0a-69ba86e0185c
Keevil, Charles
cb7de0a7-ce33-4cfa-af52-07f99e5650eb
Warnes, Sarah
f724f4bf-86cf-4b7b-bf0a-69ba86e0185c
Keevil, Charles
cb7de0a7-ce33-4cfa-af52-07f99e5650eb

Warnes, Sarah and Keevil, Charles (2016) Lack of involvement of Fenton chemistry in death of methicillin-resistant and methicillin-sensitive strains of Staphylococcus aureus and destruction of their genomes on wet or dry copper alloy surfaces. Applied and Environmental Microbiology, 82 (7), 2132-2136. (doi:10.1128/AEM.03861-15). (PMID:26826226)

Record type: Article

Abstract

The pandemic of hospital-acquired infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has declined, but the evolution of strains with enhanced virulence and toxins and the increase of community-associated infections are still a threat. In previous studies, 107 MRSA bacteria applied as simulated droplet contamination were killed on copper and brass surfaces within 90 min. However, contamination of surfaces is often via finger tips and dries rapidly, and it may be overlooked by cleaning regimes (unlike visible droplets). In this new study, a 5-log reduction of a hardy epidemic strain of MRSA (epidemic methicillin-resistant S. aureus 16 [EMRSA-16]) was observed following 10 min of contact with copper,
and a 4-log reduction was observed on copper nickel and cartridge brass alloys in 15 min. A methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) strain from an osteomyelitis patient was killed on copper surfaces in 15 min, and 4-log and 3-log reductions occurred within 20 min of contact with copper nickel and cartridge brass, respectively. Bacterial respiration was compromised on copper surfaces, and superoxide was generated as part of the killing mechanism. In addition, destruction of genomic DNA occurs on copper and brass surfaces, allaying concerns about horizontal gene transfer and copper resistance. Incorporation of copper alloy biocidal surfaces may help to reduce the spread of this dangerous pathogen.

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Appl. Environ. Microbiol.-2016-Warnes-AEM.03861-15.pdf - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 22 January 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 29 January 2016
Published date: 1 April 2016
Organisations: Centre for Biological Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 390797
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/390797
ISSN: 0099-2240
PURE UUID: 3d7ceef1-0e7d-4dc4-a25b-8a8d998e611e
ORCID for Charles Keevil: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1917-7706

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 07 Apr 2016 09:36
Last modified: 17 Dec 2019 01:51

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