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Directed forgetting in high-functioning adults with autism spectrum disorders

Directed forgetting in high-functioning adults with autism spectrum disorders
Directed forgetting in high-functioning adults with autism spectrum disorders
Rehearsal strategies of adults with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) and demographically matched typically developed (TD) adults were strategically manipulated by cueing participants to either learn, or forget each list word prior to a recognition task. Participants were also asked to distinguish between autonoetic and noetic states of awareness using the Remember/Know paradigm. The ASD group recognised a similar number of to-be-forgotten words as the TD group, but significantly fewer to-be-learned words. This deficit was only evident in Remember responses that reflect autonoetic awareness, or episodic memory, and not Know responses. These findings support the elaborative encoding deficit hypothesis and provide a link between the previously established mild episodic memory impairments in adults with high functioning autism and the encoding strategies employed.
autism, autonoetic awareness, elaborative rehearsal, episodic memory
0162-3257
2514-2524
Meyer, Brenda J.
0ba35a30-8bbf-4821-8fff-0433475d0390
Gardiner, John M.
ac4e9994-0aa4-4c5d-8bf9-551a8115e980
Bowler, Dermot M.
47233761-d6de-4c60-9751-b3270dddeb15
Meyer, Brenda J.
0ba35a30-8bbf-4821-8fff-0433475d0390
Gardiner, John M.
ac4e9994-0aa4-4c5d-8bf9-551a8115e980
Bowler, Dermot M.
47233761-d6de-4c60-9751-b3270dddeb15

Meyer, Brenda J., Gardiner, John M. and Bowler, Dermot M. (2014) Directed forgetting in high-functioning adults with autism spectrum disorders. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 44 (10), 2514-2524. (doi:10.1007/s10803-014-2121-y). (PMID:24722763)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Rehearsal strategies of adults with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) and demographically matched typically developed (TD) adults were strategically manipulated by cueing participants to either learn, or forget each list word prior to a recognition task. Participants were also asked to distinguish between autonoetic and noetic states of awareness using the Remember/Know paradigm. The ASD group recognised a similar number of to-be-forgotten words as the TD group, but significantly fewer to-be-learned words. This deficit was only evident in Remember responses that reflect autonoetic awareness, or episodic memory, and not Know responses. These findings support the elaborative encoding deficit hypothesis and provide a link between the previously established mild episodic memory impairments in adults with high functioning autism and the encoding strategies employed.

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Accepted/In Press date: 31 March 2014
e-pub ahead of print date: 11 April 2014
Published date: October 2014
Keywords: autism, autonoetic awareness, elaborative rehearsal, episodic memory
Organisations: Psychology

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 391031
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/391031
ISSN: 0162-3257
PURE UUID: e0cc0765-632f-435c-953e-34040dba8f22

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Date deposited: 08 Apr 2016 11:31
Last modified: 19 Jul 2019 20:11

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Contributors

Author: Brenda J. Meyer
Author: John M. Gardiner
Author: Dermot M. Bowler

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