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Out of school: a phenomenological exploration of extended non-attendance

Out of school: a phenomenological exploration of extended non-attendance
Out of school: a phenomenological exploration of extended non-attendance
The concept of “extended non-attendance” (“school phobia” or “school refusal”) was distinguished from truancy early in the twentieth century, and refers to children who fear school and avoid attending. Despite much subsequent research, outcomes for those affected remain poor, and their voices remain largely absent from the evidence base. The current study sought to address this by examining the experiences of four secondary-age children with extended attendance difficulties. Data consisted of semi-structured interviews conducted in participants’ homes, subsequently analysed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis. Although participants differed markedly in their perception of the causes of their non-attendance, their support experiences appear remarkably similar. Emergent themes include being disbelieved, experiencing fragmented support, and feeling blamed and punished. Implications for practitioners include the importance of ensuring early intervention, the need to consider the individual child, and the importance of making sure that local intervention practices are informed by the evidence base.
0266-7363
354-368
Baker, Matt
07d6900f-03d7-4ecd-b22d-dfbbed4e4553
Bishop, Flis
1f5429c5-325f-4ac4-aae3-6ba85d079928
Baker, Matt
07d6900f-03d7-4ecd-b22d-dfbbed4e4553
Bishop, Flis
1f5429c5-325f-4ac4-aae3-6ba85d079928

Baker, Matt and Bishop, Flis (2015) Out of school: a phenomenological exploration of extended non-attendance. Educational Psychology in Practice, 31 (4), 354-368.

Record type: Article

Abstract

The concept of “extended non-attendance” (“school phobia” or “school refusal”) was distinguished from truancy early in the twentieth century, and refers to children who fear school and avoid attending. Despite much subsequent research, outcomes for those affected remain poor, and their voices remain largely absent from the evidence base. The current study sought to address this by examining the experiences of four secondary-age children with extended attendance difficulties. Data consisted of semi-structured interviews conducted in participants’ homes, subsequently analysed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis. Although participants differed markedly in their perception of the causes of their non-attendance, their support experiences appear remarkably similar. Emergent themes include being disbelieved, experiencing fragmented support, and feeling blamed and punished. Implications for practitioners include the importance of ensuring early intervention, the need to consider the individual child, and the importance of making sure that local intervention practices are informed by the evidence base.

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Published date: 2 September 2015

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 391084
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/391084
ISSN: 0266-7363
PURE UUID: 826173a9-e098-455a-aaf4-2d4e2f04e9be
ORCID for Flis Bishop: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8737-6662

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Date deposited: 08 Apr 2016 08:43
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 12:47

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