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Computationally mediated pro-social deception

Computationally mediated pro-social deception
Computationally mediated pro-social deception
Deception is typically regarded as a morally impoverished choice. However, in the context of increasingly intimate, connected and ramified systems of online interaction, manipulating information in ways that could be considered deceptive is often necessary, useful, and even morally justifiable. In this study, we apply a speculative design approach to explore the idea of tools that assist in pro-social forms of online deception, such as those that conceal, distort, falsify and omit information in ways that promote sociality. In one-on-one semi-structured interviews, we asked 15 participants to respond to a selection of speculations, consisting of imagined tools reifying particular approaches to deception. Participants reflected upon potential practical, ethical, and social implications of the use of such tools, revealing a variety of ways such tools might one day encourage polite behaviour, support individual autonomy, provide a defence against privacy intrusions, navigate social status asymmetries, and even promote more open, honest behaviour.
deception, disinformation, speculative design, autonomy, privacy
552-563
The Association for Computing Machinery
Van Kleek, Max
d91d9d82-83cc-477b-943f-eaba8b8fdc0c
Murray-Rust, Dave
3ec27e9e-c72f-4ca2-a09f-e5585bc29785
Guy, Amy
93b22394-b26e-4641-a7d8-9d0362c07570
O'hara, Kieron
0a64a4b1-efb5-45d1-a4c2-77783f18f0c4
Shadbolt, Nigel
5c5acdf4-ad42-49b6-81fe-e9db58c2caf7
Van Kleek, Max
d91d9d82-83cc-477b-943f-eaba8b8fdc0c
Murray-Rust, Dave
3ec27e9e-c72f-4ca2-a09f-e5585bc29785
Guy, Amy
93b22394-b26e-4641-a7d8-9d0362c07570
O'hara, Kieron
0a64a4b1-efb5-45d1-a4c2-77783f18f0c4
Shadbolt, Nigel
5c5acdf4-ad42-49b6-81fe-e9db58c2caf7

Van Kleek, Max, Murray-Rust, Dave, Guy, Amy, O'hara, Kieron and Shadbolt, Nigel (2016) Computationally mediated pro-social deception. In Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings. The Association for Computing Machinery. pp. 552-563 . (doi:10.1145/2858036.2858060).

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Deception is typically regarded as a morally impoverished choice. However, in the context of increasingly intimate, connected and ramified systems of online interaction, manipulating information in ways that could be considered deceptive is often necessary, useful, and even morally justifiable. In this study, we apply a speculative design approach to explore the idea of tools that assist in pro-social forms of online deception, such as those that conceal, distort, falsify and omit information in ways that promote sociality. In one-on-one semi-structured interviews, we asked 15 participants to respond to a selection of speculations, consisting of imagined tools reifying particular approaches to deception. Participants reflected upon potential practical, ethical, and social implications of the use of such tools, revealing a variety of ways such tools might one day encourage polite behaviour, support individual autonomy, provide a defence against privacy intrusions, navigate social status asymmetries, and even promote more open, honest behaviour.

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Social_Deception_CHI_2016__Camera_Ready_ (1).pdf - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 20 January 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 7 May 2016
Published date: 7 May 2016
Venue - Dates: CHI '16 Proceedings of the 2016 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, San Jose, United States, 2016-05-06 - 2016-05-11
Keywords: deception, disinformation, speculative design, autonomy, privacy
Organisations: Web & Internet Science

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 391156
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/391156
PURE UUID: 6ffc8db3-a346-45da-be63-d039e4af44bc
ORCID for Kieron O'hara: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-9051-4456

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 07 Apr 2016 12:42
Last modified: 27 Jan 2020 13:38

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Contributors

Author: Max Van Kleek
Author: Dave Murray-Rust
Author: Amy Guy
Author: Kieron O'hara ORCID iD
Author: Nigel Shadbolt

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