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Recent advances in space-borne optical remote sensing systems for monitoring global terrestrial ecosystems

Recent advances in space-borne optical remote sensing systems for monitoring global terrestrial ecosystems
Recent advances in space-borne optical remote sensing systems for monitoring global terrestrial ecosystems
Since the launch of the first Landsat satellite in the early 1970’s, the field of space-borne optical remote sensing has made significant progress. Advances have been made in all aspects of optical remote sensing data including improved spatial, temporal, spectral and radiometric resolutions which have increased the uptake of these data by wider scientific communities. Flagship satellite missions like NASA’s Terra and Aqua and ESA’s Envisat with their high temporal (<3days) and spectral (15-36 bands) resolutions opened new opportunities for routine monitoring of various aspects of terrestrial ecosystems at global scale and have provided greater understanding of critical biophysical processes in the terrestrial ecosystem. Launch of new satellite sensors such as Landsat 8 and ESA’s Copernicus Sentinel missions (e.g. Sentinel 2 with improved spatial resolution (10-60m) and potential revisit time of 5 days) are set to revolutionise the availability and use of remote sensing data in global terrestrial ecosystem monitoring. Furthermore, the recent move towards use of constellations of nanosatellites (e.g. the the Flock missions by Planet Labs) to collect on-demand high spatial and temporal resolution optical remote sensing data would enable uptake of these data for operational monitoring. As a result of increase in data availability, i optical remote sensing data are now increasingly used to support a number of operational services (e.g. land monitoring, atmosphere monitoring, and climate change studies). However, many challenges still remain in exploiting the growing volume of optical remote sensing data to monitor global terrestrial ecosystems. These challenges include: ensuring the highest data quality both in terms of the sensitivity of sensors and the derived biophysical products, affordability and availability of the data and continuity of data acquisition. This review provides an overview of the developments in space-borne optical remote sensing in the past decade and discusses a selection of aspects of global terrestrial ecosystems where the data are currently used. It concludes by highlighting some of the challenges and opportunities of using optical remote sensing data in monitoring global terrestrial ecosystems.
Optical remote sensing, Nano satellites, Sentinel missions, ecosystem
0309-1333
322-350
Dash, Jadunandan
51468afb-3d56-4d3a-aace-736b63e9fac8
Ogutu, Booker O.
4e36f1d2-f417-4274-8f9c-4470d4808746
Dash, Jadunandan
51468afb-3d56-4d3a-aace-736b63e9fac8
Ogutu, Booker O.
4e36f1d2-f417-4274-8f9c-4470d4808746

Dash, Jadunandan and Ogutu, Booker O. (2016) Recent advances in space-borne optical remote sensing systems for monitoring global terrestrial ecosystems. Progress in Physical Geography, 40 (2), 322-350. (doi:10.1177/0309133316639403).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Since the launch of the first Landsat satellite in the early 1970’s, the field of space-borne optical remote sensing has made significant progress. Advances have been made in all aspects of optical remote sensing data including improved spatial, temporal, spectral and radiometric resolutions which have increased the uptake of these data by wider scientific communities. Flagship satellite missions like NASA’s Terra and Aqua and ESA’s Envisat with their high temporal (<3days) and spectral (15-36 bands) resolutions opened new opportunities for routine monitoring of various aspects of terrestrial ecosystems at global scale and have provided greater understanding of critical biophysical processes in the terrestrial ecosystem. Launch of new satellite sensors such as Landsat 8 and ESA’s Copernicus Sentinel missions (e.g. Sentinel 2 with improved spatial resolution (10-60m) and potential revisit time of 5 days) are set to revolutionise the availability and use of remote sensing data in global terrestrial ecosystem monitoring. Furthermore, the recent move towards use of constellations of nanosatellites (e.g. the the Flock missions by Planet Labs) to collect on-demand high spatial and temporal resolution optical remote sensing data would enable uptake of these data for operational monitoring. As a result of increase in data availability, i optical remote sensing data are now increasingly used to support a number of operational services (e.g. land monitoring, atmosphere monitoring, and climate change studies). However, many challenges still remain in exploiting the growing volume of optical remote sensing data to monitor global terrestrial ecosystems. These challenges include: ensuring the highest data quality both in terms of the sensitivity of sensors and the derived biophysical products, affordability and availability of the data and continuity of data acquisition. This review provides an overview of the developments in space-borne optical remote sensing in the past decade and discusses a selection of aspects of global terrestrial ecosystems where the data are currently used. It concludes by highlighting some of the challenges and opportunities of using optical remote sensing data in monitoring global terrestrial ecosystems.

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Accepted/In Press date: 22 February 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 7 April 2016
Published date: April 2016
Keywords: Optical remote sensing, Nano satellites, Sentinel missions, ecosystem
Organisations: Global Env Change & Earth Observation

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 391341
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/391341
ISSN: 0309-1333
PURE UUID: dfd14f58-6b31-4de0-bf5e-e5346d84e1a0
ORCID for Jadunandan Dash: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5444-2109
ORCID for Booker O. Ogutu: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1804-6205

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 12 Apr 2016 08:44
Last modified: 08 Oct 2020 04:06

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