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Nanofibrous poly(3-hydroxybutyrate)/poly(3-hydroxyoctanoate) scaffolds provide a functional microenvironment for cartilage repair

Nanofibrous poly(3-hydroxybutyrate)/poly(3-hydroxyoctanoate) scaffolds provide a functional microenvironment for cartilage repair
Nanofibrous poly(3-hydroxybutyrate)/poly(3-hydroxyoctanoate) scaffolds provide a functional microenvironment for cartilage repair
Articular cartilage defects, when repaired ineffectively, often lead to further deterioration of the tissue, secondary osteoarthritis and, ultimately, joint replacement. Unfortunately, current surgical procedures are unable to restore normal cartilage function. Tissue engineering of cartilage provides promising strategies for the regeneration of damaged articular cartilage. As yet, there are still significant challenges that need to be overcome to match the long-term mechanical stability and durability of native cartilage. Using electrospinning of different blends of biodegradable poly(3-hydroxybutyrate)/poly(3-hydroxyoctanoate), we produced polymer scaffolds and optimised their structure, stiffness, degradation rates and biocompatibility. Scaffolds with a poly(3-hydroxybutyrate)/poly(3-hydroxyoctanoate) ratio of 1:0.25 exhibit randomly oriented fibres that closely mimic the collagen fibrillar meshwork of native cartilage and match the stiffness of native articular cartilage. Degradation of the scaffolds into products that could be easily removed from the body was indicated by changes in fibre structure, loss of molecular weight and a decrease in scaffold stiffness after one and four months. Histological and immunohistochemical analysis after three weeks of culture with human articular chondrocytes revealed a hyaline-like cartilage matrix. The ability to fine tune the ultrastructure and mechanical properties using different blends of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate)/poly(3-hydroxyoctanoate) allows to produce a cartilage repair kit for clinical use to reduce the risk of developing secondary osteoarthritis. We further suggest the development of a toolbox with tailor-made scaffolds for the repair of other tissues that require a ‘guiding’ structure to support the body’s self-healing process.
Articular cartilage, tissue engineering, polyhydroxyalkanoates, electrospinning, atomic force microscopy, mechanical testing, osteoarthritis, biodegradable scaffolds
0885-3282
77-91
Ching, Kuan
1da4f515-dfce-469f-bb50-c64e68579259
Andriotis, Orestis
a32519c3-d1db-4183-9189-f3419cf32b06
Li, Siwei
7c1afb74-246f-4596-8a7d-30cd5bb4747b
Basnett, Pooja
94370299-b58a-4a0a-bc9f-3d9d8e50256c
Su, Bo
37e0f5b2-72ab-48e5-87c0-cabdfd83cc21
Roy, Ipsita
f6f44a3b-873c-4503-8400-4cef297915b8
Tare, Rahul
587c9db4-e409-4e7c-a02a-677547ab724a
Sengers, Bram
d6b771b1-4ede-48c5-9644-fa86503941aa
Stolz, Martin
7bfa1d59-511d-471b-96ce-679b343b5d1d
Ching, Kuan
1da4f515-dfce-469f-bb50-c64e68579259
Andriotis, Orestis
a32519c3-d1db-4183-9189-f3419cf32b06
Li, Siwei
7c1afb74-246f-4596-8a7d-30cd5bb4747b
Basnett, Pooja
94370299-b58a-4a0a-bc9f-3d9d8e50256c
Su, Bo
37e0f5b2-72ab-48e5-87c0-cabdfd83cc21
Roy, Ipsita
f6f44a3b-873c-4503-8400-4cef297915b8
Tare, Rahul
587c9db4-e409-4e7c-a02a-677547ab724a
Sengers, Bram
d6b771b1-4ede-48c5-9644-fa86503941aa
Stolz, Martin
7bfa1d59-511d-471b-96ce-679b343b5d1d

Ching, Kuan, Andriotis, Orestis, Li, Siwei, Basnett, Pooja, Su, Bo, Roy, Ipsita, Tare, Rahul, Sengers, Bram and Stolz, Martin (2016) Nanofibrous poly(3-hydroxybutyrate)/poly(3-hydroxyoctanoate) scaffolds provide a functional microenvironment for cartilage repair. Journal of Biomaterials Applications, 31 (1), 77-91. (doi:10.1177/0885328216639749).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Articular cartilage defects, when repaired ineffectively, often lead to further deterioration of the tissue, secondary osteoarthritis and, ultimately, joint replacement. Unfortunately, current surgical procedures are unable to restore normal cartilage function. Tissue engineering of cartilage provides promising strategies for the regeneration of damaged articular cartilage. As yet, there are still significant challenges that need to be overcome to match the long-term mechanical stability and durability of native cartilage. Using electrospinning of different blends of biodegradable poly(3-hydroxybutyrate)/poly(3-hydroxyoctanoate), we produced polymer scaffolds and optimised their structure, stiffness, degradation rates and biocompatibility. Scaffolds with a poly(3-hydroxybutyrate)/poly(3-hydroxyoctanoate) ratio of 1:0.25 exhibit randomly oriented fibres that closely mimic the collagen fibrillar meshwork of native cartilage and match the stiffness of native articular cartilage. Degradation of the scaffolds into products that could be easily removed from the body was indicated by changes in fibre structure, loss of molecular weight and a decrease in scaffold stiffness after one and four months. Histological and immunohistochemical analysis after three weeks of culture with human articular chondrocytes revealed a hyaline-like cartilage matrix. The ability to fine tune the ultrastructure and mechanical properties using different blends of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate)/poly(3-hydroxyoctanoate) allows to produce a cartilage repair kit for clinical use to reduce the risk of developing secondary osteoarthritis. We further suggest the development of a toolbox with tailor-made scaffolds for the repair of other tissues that require a ‘guiding’ structure to support the body’s self-healing process.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 23 March 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 23 March 2016
Published date: 23 March 2016
Keywords: Articular cartilage, tissue engineering, polyhydroxyalkanoates, electrospinning, atomic force microscopy, mechanical testing, osteoarthritis, biodegradable scaffolds
Organisations: nCATS Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 391393
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/391393
ISSN: 0885-3282
PURE UUID: 95ec0331-92d9-419d-9351-71fb2321401d
ORCID for Rahul Tare: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-8274-8837
ORCID for Bram Sengers: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5859-6984
ORCID for Martin Stolz: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-0732-0811

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 12 Apr 2016 10:26
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 17:13

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