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In search of the neanderthals: solving the puzzle of human origins

In search of the neanderthals: solving the puzzle of human origins
In search of the neanderthals: solving the puzzle of human origins
Ever since the first discovery of their bones, the Neanderthals have provoked controversy. Who were they? How were they related to modern people? What caused their disappearance 35,000 years ago? The Neanderthals have become the archetype of all that is primitive. But what is their true story? Today Neanderthal specialists are locked in one of the fiercest debates in modern science. One side, the "multiregional" school, argues that the Neanderthals and their contemporaries evolved semi-independently into modern humans. Christopher Stringer leads the "out of Africa" school, which believes that the Neanderthals were replaced by modern people from Africa. Here he sets out his views for the first time, with the archaeologist Clive Gamble. Step by step the authors put forward their case. The Neanderthals had an anatomy crucially different from our own, adapted to Ice Age Europe. Neanderthal behaviour similarly points to fundamental differences. New genetic evidence strongly suggests a single origin for modern humans in Africa. The authors argue that, capable and intelligent as the Neanderthals were, they proved no match for the better-organized, better-equipped newcomers, and died out.
Thames and Hudson
Stringer, Christopher
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Gamble, Clive
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Stringer, Christopher
ea256ed1-fd44-41b0-9a7f-749030f7e3dd
Gamble, Clive
1cbd0b26-ddac-4dc2-9cf7-59c66d06103a

Stringer, Christopher and Gamble, Clive (1993) In search of the neanderthals: solving the puzzle of human origins , London, GB. Thames and Hudson, 247pp.

Record type: Book

Abstract

Ever since the first discovery of their bones, the Neanderthals have provoked controversy. Who were they? How were they related to modern people? What caused their disappearance 35,000 years ago? The Neanderthals have become the archetype of all that is primitive. But what is their true story? Today Neanderthal specialists are locked in one of the fiercest debates in modern science. One side, the "multiregional" school, argues that the Neanderthals and their contemporaries evolved semi-independently into modern humans. Christopher Stringer leads the "out of Africa" school, which believes that the Neanderthals were replaced by modern people from Africa. Here he sets out his views for the first time, with the archaeologist Clive Gamble. Step by step the authors put forward their case. The Neanderthals had an anatomy crucially different from our own, adapted to Ice Age Europe. Neanderthal behaviour similarly points to fundamental differences. New genetic evidence strongly suggests a single origin for modern humans in Africa. The authors argue that, capable and intelligent as the Neanderthals were, they proved no match for the better-organized, better-equipped newcomers, and died out.

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Published date: 1993
Organisations: Archaeology

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 391482
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/391482
PURE UUID: 9735e668-8587-4947-9749-7424dff5ab92

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Date deposited: 11 Apr 2016 12:34
Last modified: 17 Jul 2017 19:23

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Contributors

Author: Christopher Stringer
Author: Clive Gamble

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