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Recent advances in active fibres

Recent advances in active fibres
Recent advances in active fibres
Optical fibres have been developed to a high degree of sophistication for long-distance transmission. Compared with coaxial cables which have a bandwidth of 20MHz or so over distances of 3 to 5km, optical fibres can have almost infinite bandwidth and repeater spacings of several hundred kilometres. They are also small, light in weight, flexible and free from electromagnetic interference. It is not surprising, therefore, that optical fibres have already revolutionised telephone and data networks and are being rapidly installed in most countries of the world. Nevertheless, in normal communications terms optical fibre communications is in a very primitive stage of development. The only operation that can be performed is that of transmitting optical information from one point to another. In order to process the information it must be converted back to electrical form and operated on in complex electronic circuits. The information then has to be reconverted to the optical wavelength. Such methods of signal amplification are complex and expensive.

The next stage of optical fibre communication will require fibre components in both passive and active form. Passive components such as couplers, switches and isolators are now becoming available commercially and research leading to active fibre devices is showing considerable promise.
Gambling, W.A.
70d15b3d-eaf7-44ed-9120-7ae47ba68324
Gambling, W.A.
70d15b3d-eaf7-44ed-9120-7ae47ba68324

Gambling, W.A. (1990) Recent advances in active fibres. Oxford/Berkeley Summer School, United Kingdom. 11 - 13 Jul 1990. 18 pp .

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Other)

Abstract

Optical fibres have been developed to a high degree of sophistication for long-distance transmission. Compared with coaxial cables which have a bandwidth of 20MHz or so over distances of 3 to 5km, optical fibres can have almost infinite bandwidth and repeater spacings of several hundred kilometres. They are also small, light in weight, flexible and free from electromagnetic interference. It is not surprising, therefore, that optical fibres have already revolutionised telephone and data networks and are being rapidly installed in most countries of the world. Nevertheless, in normal communications terms optical fibre communications is in a very primitive stage of development. The only operation that can be performed is that of transmitting optical information from one point to another. In order to process the information it must be converted back to electrical form and operated on in complex electronic circuits. The information then has to be reconverted to the optical wavelength. Such methods of signal amplification are complex and expensive.

The next stage of optical fibre communication will require fibre components in both passive and active form. Passive components such as couplers, switches and isolators are now becoming available commercially and research leading to active fibre devices is showing considerable promise.

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Published date: July 1990
Venue - Dates: Oxford/Berkeley Summer School, United Kingdom, 1990-07-11 - 1990-07-13

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 391966
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/391966
PURE UUID: dc538b97-5da8-47d7-8cc7-e74a4d5c4fa1

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Date deposited: 29 Apr 2016 15:44
Last modified: 17 Jul 2017 19:21

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Author: W.A. Gambling

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