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Ecogeochemistry potential in deep time biodiversity illustrated using a modern deep-water case study

Ecogeochemistry potential in deep time biodiversity illustrated using a modern deep-water case study
Ecogeochemistry potential in deep time biodiversity illustrated using a modern deep-water case study
The fossil record provides the only direct evidence of temporal trends in biodiversity over evolutionary timescales. Studies of biodiversity using the fossil record are, however, largely limited to discussions of taxonomic and/or morphological diversity. Behavioural and physiological traits that are likely to be under strong selection are largely obscured from the body fossil record. Similar problems exist in modern ecosystems where animals are difficult to access. In this review, we illustrate some of the common conceptual and methodological ground shared between those studying behavioural ecology in deep time and in inaccessible modern ecosystems. We discuss emerging ecogeochemical methods used to explore population connectivity and genetic drift, life-history traits and field metabolic rate and discuss some of the additional problems associated with applying these methods in deep time.
trait, palaeoecology, isotope, trace element, biomineral
0962-8436
20150223
Trueman, Clive N.
d00d3bd6-a47b-4d47-89ae-841c3d506205
Chung, Ming-Tsung
f6bb2904-ec3a-4986-9624-95f5fed6ec91
Shores, Diana
aee02c86-22af-4a99-b840-4549917d120e
Trueman, Clive N.
d00d3bd6-a47b-4d47-89ae-841c3d506205
Chung, Ming-Tsung
f6bb2904-ec3a-4986-9624-95f5fed6ec91
Shores, Diana
aee02c86-22af-4a99-b840-4549917d120e

Trueman, Clive N., Chung, Ming-Tsung and Shores, Diana (2016) Ecogeochemistry potential in deep time biodiversity illustrated using a modern deep-water case study. Philosophical Transactions of The Royal Society B Biological Sciences, 371 (1691), 20150223. (doi:10.1098/rstb.2015.0223).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The fossil record provides the only direct evidence of temporal trends in biodiversity over evolutionary timescales. Studies of biodiversity using the fossil record are, however, largely limited to discussions of taxonomic and/or morphological diversity. Behavioural and physiological traits that are likely to be under strong selection are largely obscured from the body fossil record. Similar problems exist in modern ecosystems where animals are difficult to access. In this review, we illustrate some of the common conceptual and methodological ground shared between those studying behavioural ecology in deep time and in inaccessible modern ecosystems. We discuss emerging ecogeochemical methods used to explore population connectivity and genetic drift, life-history traits and field metabolic rate and discuss some of the additional problems associated with applying these methods in deep time.

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More information

Published date: 14 March 2016
Keywords: trait, palaeoecology, isotope, trace element, biomineral
Organisations: Geochemistry

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 392045
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/392045
ISSN: 0962-8436
PURE UUID: ab1f88c8-5024-43ab-ac26-56e931a5489b

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 13 Apr 2016 10:45
Last modified: 15 Jul 2019 20:36

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