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Exploring the mechanisms of distraction from in-vehicle technology: the development of the PARRC model

Exploring the mechanisms of distraction from in-vehicle technology: the development of the PARRC model
Exploring the mechanisms of distraction from in-vehicle technology: the development of the PARRC model
Technological advances are impacting in-vehicle systems, providing more secondary tasks for drivers to engage with. The adverse impacts of this on driver safety requires further insight to determine the mechanisms involved in distraction and countermeasures to mitigate it. Contemporary approaches highlight the need to move away from individualistic strategies in distraction mitigation, towards a systems perspective that accounts for the road transport system as a whole. This paper applied grounded theory to identify five key factors of distraction and their relationships that were incorporated into the Priority, Adapt, Resource, Regulate, Conflict (PARRC) systems model of driver distraction. Applying this model to a case study suggests how taking a systems perspective to the phenomenon may hold elements within the wider road transport system responsible for distraction incidents. This opens up the potential for countermeasures higher up in the causal chain of events.
in-vehicle technology, driver distraction, grounded theory, road transport system
0925-7535
25-37
Parnell, Katie
3f21709a-403b-40e1-844b-0c0a89063b7b
Stanton, Neville
351a44ab-09a0-422a-a738-01df1fe0fadd
Plant, Katie
3638555a-f2ca-4539-962c-422686518a78
Parnell, Katie
3f21709a-403b-40e1-844b-0c0a89063b7b
Stanton, Neville
351a44ab-09a0-422a-a738-01df1fe0fadd
Plant, Katie
3638555a-f2ca-4539-962c-422686518a78

Parnell, Katie, Stanton, Neville and Plant, Katie (2016) Exploring the mechanisms of distraction from in-vehicle technology: the development of the PARRC model. Safety Science, 87, 25-37. (doi:10.1016/j.ssci.2016.03.014).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Technological advances are impacting in-vehicle systems, providing more secondary tasks for drivers to engage with. The adverse impacts of this on driver safety requires further insight to determine the mechanisms involved in distraction and countermeasures to mitigate it. Contemporary approaches highlight the need to move away from individualistic strategies in distraction mitigation, towards a systems perspective that accounts for the road transport system as a whole. This paper applied grounded theory to identify five key factors of distraction and their relationships that were incorporated into the Priority, Adapt, Resource, Regulate, Conflict (PARRC) systems model of driver distraction. Applying this model to a case study suggests how taking a systems perspective to the phenomenon may hold elements within the wider road transport system responsible for distraction incidents. This opens up the potential for countermeasures higher up in the causal chain of events.

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__filestore.soton.ac.uk_users_krc1d15_mydesktop_Parnell Stanton Plant (2016) Accepted Submission .pdf - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 14 March 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 21 March 2016
Published date: August 2016
Keywords: in-vehicle technology, driver distraction, grounded theory, road transport system
Organisations: Transportation Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 392653
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/392653
ISSN: 0925-7535
PURE UUID: 3655a416-58e5-47cf-911b-b0d3deb7bb51
ORCID for Neville Stanton: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8562-3279
ORCID for Katie Plant: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4532-2818

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 15 Apr 2016 08:56
Last modified: 21 Nov 2021 05:16

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