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The activation of complement and its role in the pathogenesis of thromboembolism

The activation of complement and its role in the pathogenesis of thromboembolism
The activation of complement and its role in the pathogenesis of thromboembolism
It is well established that inflammation and thrombosis are intricately linked processes, and there is increasing evidence of the importance of their roles in activated complement in the pathogenesis of thromboembolism. The two systems are activated by similar stimuli simultaneously and interact, either directly or through biochemical mediators, to protect the host from microbial invasion. Diseases characterized by complement hyperactivity such as paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria and atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome have high rates of thrombosis. This review describes how disease processes where there is excessive complement activation leads to thrombosis, and the specific interactions between the complement and coagulation systems that lead to pathological thrombus formation.
0094-6176
665-672
Boyce, Sara
53e3ffb0-7f21-409e-9ab6-88fdc0e15b00
Eren, Efrem
ac449fc8-4ae2-4efd-ad91-9dcea3f355e2
Lwaleed, Bashir A.
e7c59131-82ad-4a14-a227-7370e91e3f21
Kazmi, Rashid S.
b31ef6bd-7f85-439d-ae28-8d097a7b8a41
Boyce, Sara
53e3ffb0-7f21-409e-9ab6-88fdc0e15b00
Eren, Efrem
ac449fc8-4ae2-4efd-ad91-9dcea3f355e2
Lwaleed, Bashir A.
e7c59131-82ad-4a14-a227-7370e91e3f21
Kazmi, Rashid S.
b31ef6bd-7f85-439d-ae28-8d097a7b8a41

Boyce, Sara, Eren, Efrem, Lwaleed, Bashir A. and Kazmi, Rashid S. (2015) The activation of complement and its role in the pathogenesis of thromboembolism. Seminars in Thrombosis and Hemostasis, 41 (6), 665-672. (doi:10.1055/s-0035-1556732).

Record type: Article

Abstract

It is well established that inflammation and thrombosis are intricately linked processes, and there is increasing evidence of the importance of their roles in activated complement in the pathogenesis of thromboembolism. The two systems are activated by similar stimuli simultaneously and interact, either directly or through biochemical mediators, to protect the host from microbial invasion. Diseases characterized by complement hyperactivity such as paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria and atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome have high rates of thrombosis. This review describes how disease processes where there is excessive complement activation leads to thrombosis, and the specific interactions between the complement and coagulation systems that lead to pathological thrombus formation.

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 25 August 2015
Published date: September 2015
Organisations: Faculty of Health Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 393042
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/393042
ISSN: 0094-6176
PURE UUID: e81e1ece-0bf2-4223-85b3-f243279ba622

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Date deposited: 29 Jun 2016 15:11
Last modified: 15 Jul 2019 20:34

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