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Specific and individuated death reflection fosters identity integration

Specific and individuated death reflection fosters identity integration
Specific and individuated death reflection fosters identity integration
Identity integration is the process wherein a person assimilates multiple or conflicting identities (e.g., beliefs, values, needs) into a coherent, unified self-concept. Three experiments examined whether contemplating mortality in a specific and individuated manner (i.e., via the death reflection manipulation) facilitated outcomes indicative of identity integration. Participants in the death reflection condition (vs. control conditions) considered positive and negative life experiences as equally important in shaping their current identity (Experiment 1), regarded self-serving values and other-serving values as equally important life principles (Experiment 2), and were equally motivated to pursue growth-oriented and security-oriented needs (Experiment 3). Death reflection motivates individuals to integrate conflicting aspects of their identity into a coherent self-concept. Given that identity integration is associated with higher well-being, the findings have implications for understanding the psychological benefits of existential contemplation.
1932-6203
1-17
Blackie, Laura E.R.
26ab5279-e94c-4468-870d-0b4efc9de75c
Cozzolino, Philip J.
ccbf622f-7e05-4d7a-b131-cb44ce6ba17b
Sedikides, Constantine
9d45e66d-75bb-44de-87d7-21fd553812c2
Blackie, Laura E.R.
26ab5279-e94c-4468-870d-0b4efc9de75c
Cozzolino, Philip J.
ccbf622f-7e05-4d7a-b131-cb44ce6ba17b
Sedikides, Constantine
9d45e66d-75bb-44de-87d7-21fd553812c2

Blackie, Laura E.R., Cozzolino, Philip J. and Sedikides, Constantine (2016) Specific and individuated death reflection fosters identity integration. PLoS ONE, 11 (5), 1-17, [e0154873]. (doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0154873).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Identity integration is the process wherein a person assimilates multiple or conflicting identities (e.g., beliefs, values, needs) into a coherent, unified self-concept. Three experiments examined whether contemplating mortality in a specific and individuated manner (i.e., via the death reflection manipulation) facilitated outcomes indicative of identity integration. Participants in the death reflection condition (vs. control conditions) considered positive and negative life experiences as equally important in shaping their current identity (Experiment 1), regarded self-serving values and other-serving values as equally important life principles (Experiment 2), and were equally motivated to pursue growth-oriented and security-oriented needs (Experiment 3). Death reflection motivates individuals to integrate conflicting aspects of their identity into a coherent self-concept. Given that identity integration is associated with higher well-being, the findings have implications for understanding the psychological benefits of existential contemplation.

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2016 Blackie, Cozzolino, & Sedikides, PLoS One - Accepted Manuscript
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journal.pone.0154873 - Version of Record
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 21 April 2016
Published date: 6 May 2016

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 393349
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/393349
ISSN: 1932-6203
PURE UUID: 21252568-c075-437f-a203-3e1cb282522e

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Date deposited: 26 Apr 2016 08:55
Last modified: 16 Jul 2020 16:32

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