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Freedom’s cry: the popular dimension in the Pakistan Movement and Partition experience in North West India

Freedom’s cry: the popular dimension in the Pakistan Movement and Partition experience in North West India
Freedom’s cry: the popular dimension in the Pakistan Movement and Partition experience in North West India
Standard historical accounts of the emergence of Pakistan have been dominated by events and issues at the elite level of politics. This book introduces two new angles to the subject. It lays particular emphasis firstly on the role of popular participation in the freedom struggle and secondly on the human dimension of the Partition experience. In order to open up these fresh perspectives this study utilizes new sources, including the extended use of fictitional representation. In addition to the injection of a human perspective into the historical discourse on Pakistan's emergence, the author provides comprehensive data on refugee resettlement and bibliographical notes.

Ian Talbot examines the role of popular participation in the Pakistan Movement and the social and psychological impact of the 1947 experience. While standard historical accounts have been dominated by events and issues at the elite level of politics, the author introduces two more angles to the study of the Freedom Movement: he lays particular emphasis on, firstly, the role of the ordinary citizen, and secondly, the human dimension of the Partition experience. Exploring these fresh perspectives, he includes the extended use of fictional representatiion and provides comprehensive data on refugee resettlement.
Oxford University Press
Talbot, Ian
b240135a-0cab-4162-b8a6-922fbeec492f
Talbot, Ian
b240135a-0cab-4162-b8a6-922fbeec492f

Talbot, Ian (1996) Freedom’s cry: the popular dimension in the Pakistan Movement and Partition experience in North West India , Karachi, PK. Oxford University Press, 246pp.

Record type: Book

Abstract

Standard historical accounts of the emergence of Pakistan have been dominated by events and issues at the elite level of politics. This book introduces two new angles to the subject. It lays particular emphasis firstly on the role of popular participation in the freedom struggle and secondly on the human dimension of the Partition experience. In order to open up these fresh perspectives this study utilizes new sources, including the extended use of fictitional representation. In addition to the injection of a human perspective into the historical discourse on Pakistan's emergence, the author provides comprehensive data on refugee resettlement and bibliographical notes.

Ian Talbot examines the role of popular participation in the Pakistan Movement and the social and psychological impact of the 1947 experience. While standard historical accounts have been dominated by events and issues at the elite level of politics, the author introduces two more angles to the study of the Freedom Movement: he lays particular emphasis on, firstly, the role of the ordinary citizen, and secondly, the human dimension of the Partition experience. Exploring these fresh perspectives, he includes the extended use of fictional representatiion and provides comprehensive data on refugee resettlement.

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Published date: 1996
Organisations: History

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 393387
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/393387
PURE UUID: dbaa0d67-e7a8-40ef-b722-66947d167806

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Date deposited: 27 Apr 2016 10:53
Last modified: 17 Jul 2017 19:08

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