The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Extreme warm temperatures alter forest phenology and productivity in Europe

Extreme warm temperatures alter forest phenology and productivity in Europe
Extreme warm temperatures alter forest phenology and productivity in Europe
Recent climate warming has shifted the timing of spring and autumn vegetation phenological events in the temperate and boreal forest ecosystems of Europe. In many areas spring phenological events start earlier and autumn events switch between earlier and later onset. Consequently, the length of growing season in mid and high latitudes of European forest is extended. However, the lagged effects (i.e. the impact of a warm spring or autumn on the subsequent phenological events) on vegetation phenology and productivity are less explored. In this study, we have (1) characterised extreme warm spring and extreme warm autumn events in Europe during 2003-2011, and (2) investigated if direct impact on forest phenology and productivity due to a specific warm event translated to a lagged effect in subsequent phenological events. We found that warmer events in spring occurred extensively in high latitude Europe producing a significant earlier onset of greening (OG) in broadleaf deciduous forest (BLDF) and mixed forest (MF). However, this earlier OG did not show any significant lagged effects on autumnal senescence. Needleleaf evergreen forest (NLEF), BLDF and MF showed a significantly delayed end of senescence (EOS) as a result of extreme warm autumn events; and in the following year’s spring phenological events, OG started significantly earlier. Extreme warm spring events directly led to significant (p=0.0189) increases in the productivity of BLDF. In order to have a complete understanding of ecosystems response to warm temperature during key phenological events, particularly autumn events, the lagged effect on the next growing season should be considered.
land surface phenology, envisat mtci, anomalous temperature, climate variability, lagged effect, forest ecology
0048-9697
1-44
Crabbe, Richard A.
287dfc81-9593-4e6a-bb93-63aefebfe408
Dash, Jadunandan
51468afb-3d56-4d3a-aace-736b63e9fac8
Rodriguez Galiano, Victor F.
88495556-2795-456d-b972-31ca79fe4a71
Janous, Dalibor
7d4909d0-f6cf-4e55-bbfd-3a99ca368e3c
Pavelka, Marian
36955961-019d-4aa3-9172-490955b93128
Marek, Michal V.
abbc9300-d496-4d40-90da-431e57e4dc81
Crabbe, Richard A.
287dfc81-9593-4e6a-bb93-63aefebfe408
Dash, Jadunandan
51468afb-3d56-4d3a-aace-736b63e9fac8
Rodriguez Galiano, Victor F.
88495556-2795-456d-b972-31ca79fe4a71
Janous, Dalibor
7d4909d0-f6cf-4e55-bbfd-3a99ca368e3c
Pavelka, Marian
36955961-019d-4aa3-9172-490955b93128
Marek, Michal V.
abbc9300-d496-4d40-90da-431e57e4dc81

Crabbe, Richard A., Dash, Jadunandan, Rodriguez Galiano, Victor F., Janous, Dalibor, Pavelka, Marian and Marek, Michal V. (2016) Extreme warm temperatures alter forest phenology and productivity in Europe. Science of the Total Environment, 1-44. (In Press)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Recent climate warming has shifted the timing of spring and autumn vegetation phenological events in the temperate and boreal forest ecosystems of Europe. In many areas spring phenological events start earlier and autumn events switch between earlier and later onset. Consequently, the length of growing season in mid and high latitudes of European forest is extended. However, the lagged effects (i.e. the impact of a warm spring or autumn on the subsequent phenological events) on vegetation phenology and productivity are less explored. In this study, we have (1) characterised extreme warm spring and extreme warm autumn events in Europe during 2003-2011, and (2) investigated if direct impact on forest phenology and productivity due to a specific warm event translated to a lagged effect in subsequent phenological events. We found that warmer events in spring occurred extensively in high latitude Europe producing a significant earlier onset of greening (OG) in broadleaf deciduous forest (BLDF) and mixed forest (MF). However, this earlier OG did not show any significant lagged effects on autumnal senescence. Needleleaf evergreen forest (NLEF), BLDF and MF showed a significantly delayed end of senescence (EOS) as a result of extreme warm autumn events; and in the following year’s spring phenological events, OG started significantly earlier. Extreme warm spring events directly led to significant (p=0.0189) increases in the productivity of BLDF. In order to have a complete understanding of ecosystems response to warm temperature during key phenological events, particularly autumn events, the lagged effect on the next growing season should be considered.

Text
__soton.ac.uk_ude_PersonalFiles_Users_jadu_mydocuments_GEM_MSC_GEM2012_Richard_SOTEN_Revision_Final_Revised manuscript with no changes marked.docx - Accepted Manuscript
Download (2MB)

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 18 April 2016
Keywords: land surface phenology, envisat mtci, anomalous temperature, climate variability, lagged effect, forest ecology
Organisations: Global Env Change & Earth Observation

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 393513
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/393513
ISSN: 0048-9697
PURE UUID: feb4f87d-bffa-4848-a7ae-7d0fb30fa2e3
ORCID for Jadunandan Dash: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5444-2109

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 28 Apr 2016 11:03
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 06:03

Export record

Contributors

Author: Richard A. Crabbe
Author: Jadunandan Dash ORCID iD
Author: Victor F. Rodriguez Galiano
Author: Dalibor Janous
Author: Marian Pavelka
Author: Michal V. Marek

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×