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Fat and carbohydrate intake over three generations modify growth, metabolism and cardiovascular phenotype in female mice in an age-related manner

Fat and carbohydrate intake over three generations modify growth, metabolism and cardiovascular phenotype in female mice in an age-related manner
Fat and carbohydrate intake over three generations modify growth, metabolism and cardiovascular phenotype in female mice in an age-related manner
Environmental challenges such as a high fat diet during pregnancy can induce changes in offspring growth, metabolism and cardiovascular function. However, challenges that are sustained over several generations can induce progressive compensatory metabolic adjustments in young adults. It is not known if such effects persist during ageing. We investigated whether diets with different fat and carbohydrate contents over three generations modifies markers of ageing. Female C57BL/6 F0 mice were fed diets containing 5% or 21% fat (w/w) throughout pregnancy and lactation. Female offspring were fed the same diet as their dams until the F3 generation. In each generation, body weight, 24-hour food intake were recorded weekly, and plasma metabolites were measured by colorimetric assays, blood pressure by tail cuff plethysmography and vasoconstriction by myography on postnatal day 90 or 456. There was little effect of diet or generation on phenotypic markers in day 90 adults. There was a significant increase in whole body, liver and heart weight with ageing (d456) in the F3 21% fat group compared to the F1 and F3 5% groups. Fasting plasma glucose concentration was significantly increased with ageing in the 5% group in the F3 generation and in the 21% group in both generations. There was a significant effect of diet and generation on ex-vivo vasoconstriction in ageing females. Differences in dietary fat may induce metabolic compensation in young adults that persist over three generations. However, such compensatory effects decline during ageing.
1932-6203
1-14
Hoile, Samuel P.
9d7e9816-600d-45bd-ade2-dc7798bba730
Grenfell, Leonie M.
623636dc-7565-445b-84bb-193498b97a1d
Hanson, Mark. A
1952fad1-abc7-4284-a0bc-a7eb31f70a3f
Lillycrop, Karen. A
eeaaa78d-0c4d-4033-a178-60ce7345a2cc
Burdge, Graham. C
09d60a07-8ca1-4351-9bf1-de6ffcfb2159
Hoile, Samuel P.
9d7e9816-600d-45bd-ade2-dc7798bba730
Grenfell, Leonie M.
623636dc-7565-445b-84bb-193498b97a1d
Hanson, Mark. A
1952fad1-abc7-4284-a0bc-a7eb31f70a3f
Lillycrop, Karen. A
eeaaa78d-0c4d-4033-a178-60ce7345a2cc
Burdge, Graham. C
09d60a07-8ca1-4351-9bf1-de6ffcfb2159

Hoile, Samuel P., Grenfell, Leonie M., Hanson, Mark. A, Lillycrop, Karen. A and Burdge, Graham. C (2015) Fat and carbohydrate intake over three generations modify growth, metabolism and cardiovascular phenotype in female mice in an age-related manner. PLoS ONE, 10 (8), 1-14. (doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0134664). (PMID:26266533)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Environmental challenges such as a high fat diet during pregnancy can induce changes in offspring growth, metabolism and cardiovascular function. However, challenges that are sustained over several generations can induce progressive compensatory metabolic adjustments in young adults. It is not known if such effects persist during ageing. We investigated whether diets with different fat and carbohydrate contents over three generations modifies markers of ageing. Female C57BL/6 F0 mice were fed diets containing 5% or 21% fat (w/w) throughout pregnancy and lactation. Female offspring were fed the same diet as their dams until the F3 generation. In each generation, body weight, 24-hour food intake were recorded weekly, and plasma metabolites were measured by colorimetric assays, blood pressure by tail cuff plethysmography and vasoconstriction by myography on postnatal day 90 or 456. There was little effect of diet or generation on phenotypic markers in day 90 adults. There was a significant increase in whole body, liver and heart weight with ageing (d456) in the F3 21% fat group compared to the F1 and F3 5% groups. Fasting plasma glucose concentration was significantly increased with ageing in the 5% group in the F3 generation and in the 21% group in both generations. There was a significant effect of diet and generation on ex-vivo vasoconstriction in ageing females. Differences in dietary fat may induce metabolic compensation in young adults that persist over three generations. However, such compensatory effects decline during ageing.

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Accepted/In Press date: 13 July 2015
Published date: 12 August 2015
Organisations: Biomedicine

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Local EPrints ID: 393692
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/393692
ISSN: 1932-6203
PURE UUID: c2a5881a-83f2-42ce-a50f-d8a9784821f9
ORCID for Mark. A Hanson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6907-613X
ORCID for Karen. A Lillycrop: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-7350-5489
ORCID for Graham. C Burdge: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7665-2967

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Date deposited: 29 Apr 2016 15:54
Last modified: 20 Jul 2019 01:23

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Author: Samuel P. Hoile
Author: Leonie M. Grenfell
Author: Mark. A Hanson ORCID iD

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