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Breast cancer and the importance of early life nutrition

Breast cancer and the importance of early life nutrition
Breast cancer and the importance of early life nutrition
Epigenetic processes play a central role in regulating the tissue-specific expression of genes. Alterations in these processes can lead to profound changes in phenotype and have been implicated in the pathogenesis of many human diseases including human cancer. There is growing evidence that the environment, particularly variations in diet, during specific developmental periods can induce changes in the epigenome, which are then stably maintained throughout life influencing susceptibility to cancer in later life. This chapter will review the evidence that alterations in early life nutritional exposure can affect breast cancer risk through the altered epigenetic regulation of genes and discuss how detection of such altered epigenetic marks in early life may provide biomarkers to detect individuals at increased risk of disease.
159
269-285
Springer
Lillycrop, Karen A.
eeaaa78d-0c4d-4033-a178-60ce7345a2cc
Burdge, Graham C
09d60a07-8ca1-4351-9bf1-de6ffcfb2159
Zappia, Vincenzo
Panico, Salvatore
Russo, Gian Luigi
Budillon, Alfredo
Ragione, Fulvio Della
Lillycrop, Karen A.
eeaaa78d-0c4d-4033-a178-60ce7345a2cc
Burdge, Graham C
09d60a07-8ca1-4351-9bf1-de6ffcfb2159
Zappia, Vincenzo
Panico, Salvatore
Russo, Gian Luigi
Budillon, Alfredo
Ragione, Fulvio Della

Lillycrop, Karen A. and Burdge, Graham C (2013) Breast cancer and the importance of early life nutrition. In, Zappia, Vincenzo, Panico, Salvatore, Russo, Gian Luigi, Budillon, Alfredo and Ragione, Fulvio Della (eds.) Advances in Nutrition and Cancer. (Cancer Treatment and Research, , (doi:10.1007/978-3-642-38007-5_16), 159) Berlin, DE. Springer, pp. 269-285. (doi:10.1007/978-3-642-38007-5_16).

Record type: Book Section

Abstract

Epigenetic processes play a central role in regulating the tissue-specific expression of genes. Alterations in these processes can lead to profound changes in phenotype and have been implicated in the pathogenesis of many human diseases including human cancer. There is growing evidence that the environment, particularly variations in diet, during specific developmental periods can induce changes in the epigenome, which are then stably maintained throughout life influencing susceptibility to cancer in later life. This chapter will review the evidence that alterations in early life nutritional exposure can affect breast cancer risk through the altered epigenetic regulation of genes and discuss how detection of such altered epigenetic marks in early life may provide biomarkers to detect individuals at increased risk of disease.

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978-3-642-38007-5_16 - Other
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Published date: 11 October 2013
Organisations: Faculty of Medicine, Biomedicine

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 393698
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/393698
PURE UUID: b71f02e8-3c4b-43c3-bfdc-d17cec33cd1d
ORCID for Karen A. Lillycrop: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-7350-5489
ORCID for Graham C Burdge: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7665-2967

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Date deposited: 17 Jun 2016 13:23
Last modified: 10 Sep 2019 00:55

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