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Are open news systems credible? An investigation into perceptions of participatory and citizen news

Are open news systems credible? An investigation into perceptions of participatory and citizen news
Are open news systems credible? An investigation into perceptions of participatory and citizen news
The growth of the web has led to a shift in the news industry and the emergence of novel news services. Due to the importance of news media in society it is important to understand how these systems work and how they are perceived. Previous work has ranked news systems in terms of their openness to user contribution, noting that the most open systems (such as YouTube) are typically not viewed as news systems at all, despite having most of the same functional characteristics. In this paper we explore whether credibility is an appropriate characteristic to explain this perception by presenting the results of a survey of 79 people regarding their credibility assessments of online news websites. We compare this perceived credibility with the openness of the systems as identified in previous work. Results show that there is a modest but significant correlation between the openness of a news system and its credibility, and suggest that credibility is an appropriate if imperfect explanation of the difference in perception of open and closed news systems
263-270
Scott, Jonathan
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Millard, David
4f19bca5-80dc-4533-a101-89a5a0e3b372
Leonard, Pauline
a2839090-eccc-4d84-ab63-c6a484c6d7c1
Scott, Jonathan
d1d8c6ed-90cc-4d26-a053-aece826dc716
Millard, David
4f19bca5-80dc-4533-a101-89a5a0e3b372
Leonard, Pauline
a2839090-eccc-4d84-ab63-c6a484c6d7c1

Scott, Jonathan, Millard, David and Leonard, Pauline (2016) Are open news systems credible? An investigation into perceptions of participatory and citizen news. 12th International Conference on Web Information Systems and Technologies, Italy. pp. 263-270 . (doi:10.5220/0005858702630270).

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

The growth of the web has led to a shift in the news industry and the emergence of novel news services. Due to the importance of news media in society it is important to understand how these systems work and how they are perceived. Previous work has ranked news systems in terms of their openness to user contribution, noting that the most open systems (such as YouTube) are typically not viewed as news systems at all, despite having most of the same functional characteristics. In this paper we explore whether credibility is an appropriate characteristic to explain this perception by presenting the results of a survey of 79 people regarding their credibility assessments of online news websites. We compare this perceived credibility with the openness of the systems as identified in previous work. Results show that there is a modest but significant correlation between the openness of a news system and its credibility, and suggest that credibility is an appropriate if imperfect explanation of the difference in perception of open and closed news systems

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Accepted/In Press date: 1 February 2016
Published date: 23 April 2016
Venue - Dates: 12th International Conference on Web Information Systems and Technologies, Italy, 2016-04-23
Organisations: Web & Internet Science

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 393805
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/393805
PURE UUID: a00a7fd1-8a3f-47ef-af78-5a3cacd2f78c
ORCID for David Millard: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7512-2710
ORCID for Pauline Leonard: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8112-0631

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 07 Jul 2016 08:42
Last modified: 27 Mar 2019 01:37

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Contributors

Author: Jonathan Scott
Author: David Millard ORCID iD
Author: Pauline Leonard ORCID iD

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