The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Impairment of lysophospholipid metabolism in obesity: altered plasma profile and desensitization to the modulatory properties of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in a randomized controlled trial

Impairment of lysophospholipid metabolism in obesity: altered plasma profile and desensitization to the modulatory properties of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in a randomized controlled trial
Impairment of lysophospholipid metabolism in obesity: altered plasma profile and desensitization to the modulatory properties of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in a randomized controlled trial
Background: Plasma lysophospholipids have emerged as signaling molecules with important effects on inflammation, insulin resistance, and fatty liver disease, each of which is linked closely to obesity. Dietary n-3 (ω-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) may be able to improve these conditions.
Objective: The objective of this study was to assess the response of plasma lysophospholipids to obesity, n-3 PUFA consumption, and a high-fat meal challenge to better understand the role of lysophospholipid metabolism in the progression of obesity-related disorders.
Design: We determined the concentrations of 8 lysophosphatidylcholines, 11 lysophosphatidylethanolamines, and 7 lysophosphatidylinositols in the plasma of 34 normal-weight and 38 obese subjects randomly assigned to consume corn oil (control) or n-3 PUFA-rich fish oil (3 g/d; n = 15-19/group) for 90 d. Blood samples were collected on the last day of the study under fasting conditions and 6 h after a high-fat meal (1135 kcal, 86 g fat) challenge. The profile of secreted lysophospholipids was studied in HepG2 cells under palmitate-induced steatosis.
Results: Obese and normal-weight subjects had different profiles of plasma lysophospholipids. A multivariate combination of the 26 lysophospholipids could discriminate between normal-weight and obese subjects with an accuracy of 98%. The high-fat meal challenge altered the concentration of plasma lysophosphatidylcholines in an oil treatment-dependent manner in normal-weight but not obese subjects, suggesting that obesity impairs the sensitivity of lysophospholipid metabolism to n-3 PUFAs. Noncytotoxic steatosis in HepG2 cells affected the secretion pattern of lysophospholipids, partially resembling the changes observed in the plasma of obese subjects.
Conclusions: Obesity has a substantial impact on lysophospholipid metabolism, altering the plasma lysophospholipid profile and abolishing its sensitivity to dietary n-3 PUFAs. These effects could contribute to the onset or progression of alterations associated with obesity, such as inflammation, insulin resistance, and fatty liver disease.
0002-9165
266-279
del Bas, Josep M.
30bdaf4b-2ef5-4d62-86ec-57b556a9a152
Caimari, Antoni
f251d404-c75e-434b-8566-d8a8ef711d00
Rodriguez-Naranjo, Maria Isabel
83852d3c-943e-4622-bbde-f92084c60132
Childs, Caroline E.
ea17ccc1-2eac-4f67-96c7-a0c4d9dfd9c5
Paras Chavez, Carolina
0f7aafea-1072-4f66-a3cd-59e0ee16716d
West, Annette L.
e8dacc1a-5fdc-4a4f-92d8-608f2ea2994c
Miles, Elizabeth A.
20332899-ecdb-4214-95bc-922dde36d416
Arola, 4 Lluis
71f96c83-a856-439b-b0d2-d26b05d6797b
Calder, Philip C.
1797e54f-378e-4dcb-80a4-3e30018f07a6
del Bas, Josep M.
30bdaf4b-2ef5-4d62-86ec-57b556a9a152
Caimari, Antoni
f251d404-c75e-434b-8566-d8a8ef711d00
Rodriguez-Naranjo, Maria Isabel
83852d3c-943e-4622-bbde-f92084c60132
Childs, Caroline E.
ea17ccc1-2eac-4f67-96c7-a0c4d9dfd9c5
Paras Chavez, Carolina
0f7aafea-1072-4f66-a3cd-59e0ee16716d
West, Annette L.
e8dacc1a-5fdc-4a4f-92d8-608f2ea2994c
Miles, Elizabeth A.
20332899-ecdb-4214-95bc-922dde36d416
Arola, 4 Lluis
71f96c83-a856-439b-b0d2-d26b05d6797b
Calder, Philip C.
1797e54f-378e-4dcb-80a4-3e30018f07a6

del Bas, Josep M., Caimari, Antoni, Rodriguez-Naranjo, Maria Isabel, Childs, Caroline E., Paras Chavez, Carolina, West, Annette L., Miles, Elizabeth A., Arola, 4 Lluis and Calder, Philip C. (2016) Impairment of lysophospholipid metabolism in obesity: altered plasma profile and desensitization to the modulatory properties of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in a randomized controlled trial. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 104 (2), 266-279. (doi:10.3945/ajcn.116.130872). (PMID:27305954)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: Plasma lysophospholipids have emerged as signaling molecules with important effects on inflammation, insulin resistance, and fatty liver disease, each of which is linked closely to obesity. Dietary n-3 (ω-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) may be able to improve these conditions.
Objective: The objective of this study was to assess the response of plasma lysophospholipids to obesity, n-3 PUFA consumption, and a high-fat meal challenge to better understand the role of lysophospholipid metabolism in the progression of obesity-related disorders.
Design: We determined the concentrations of 8 lysophosphatidylcholines, 11 lysophosphatidylethanolamines, and 7 lysophosphatidylinositols in the plasma of 34 normal-weight and 38 obese subjects randomly assigned to consume corn oil (control) or n-3 PUFA-rich fish oil (3 g/d; n = 15-19/group) for 90 d. Blood samples were collected on the last day of the study under fasting conditions and 6 h after a high-fat meal (1135 kcal, 86 g fat) challenge. The profile of secreted lysophospholipids was studied in HepG2 cells under palmitate-induced steatosis.
Results: Obese and normal-weight subjects had different profiles of plasma lysophospholipids. A multivariate combination of the 26 lysophospholipids could discriminate between normal-weight and obese subjects with an accuracy of 98%. The high-fat meal challenge altered the concentration of plasma lysophosphatidylcholines in an oil treatment-dependent manner in normal-weight but not obese subjects, suggesting that obesity impairs the sensitivity of lysophospholipid metabolism to n-3 PUFAs. Noncytotoxic steatosis in HepG2 cells affected the secretion pattern of lysophospholipids, partially resembling the changes observed in the plasma of obese subjects.
Conclusions: Obesity has a substantial impact on lysophospholipid metabolism, altering the plasma lysophospholipid profile and abolishing its sensitivity to dietary n-3 PUFAs. These effects could contribute to the onset or progression of alterations associated with obesity, such as inflammation, insulin resistance, and fatty liver disease.

Text
__soton.ac.uk_ude_PersonalFiles_Users_lce_mydocuments_Eprints - Prof Calder_Accepted publications for eprints_AJCN-2016-130872v3-Caimari.pdf - Accepted Manuscript
Download (1MB)

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 5 May 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 15 June 2016
Published date: 1 August 2016
Organisations: Faculty of Medicine, Human Development & Health

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 393889
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/393889
ISSN: 0002-9165
PURE UUID: e845130f-460d-4ab2-833b-1674edb671dd
ORCID for Caroline E. Childs: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-6832-224X
ORCID for Elizabeth A. Miles: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8643-0655
ORCID for Philip C. Calder: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6038-710X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 06 May 2016 15:45
Last modified: 11 Mar 2021 02:35

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×