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Discovering credit card fraud methods in online tutorials

Discovering credit card fraud methods in online tutorials
Discovering credit card fraud methods in online tutorials
Online underground forums allow for the sharing of up-to-date knowledge on how to optimally commit an online crime. Tutorials focusing on specific online crimes are commonplace and provide members of underground communities with all the information needed to engage in illicit transactions. In this article, tutorials that focus on the online process of cashing out stolen credit card details, i.e. carding, will be analysed. A crime script analysis will reveal the most common ways in which carding is executed. We found that if these paths are meticulously followed, interceptive opportunities are limited for law enforcement. Cases of deviation from these paths are not uncommon, which renders situational crime prevention measures less effective. As a potential solution, we propose the uptake of prospect theory as an analytical tool to account for deviations from the criminal optimal norm. In future work, such a method could better account for all the various ways in which fraudulent activity is committed and contribute to thinking about new preventive measures.
Van Hardeveld, Gert
e501b3a6-4385-43ad-8ccc-7aa16ec01b3b
Webber, Craig
35851bbe-83e6-4c9b-9dd2-cdf1f60c245d
O'Hara, Kieron
0a64a4b1-efb5-45d1-a4c2-77783f18f0c4
Van Hardeveld, Gert
e501b3a6-4385-43ad-8ccc-7aa16ec01b3b
Webber, Craig
35851bbe-83e6-4c9b-9dd2-cdf1f60c245d
O'Hara, Kieron
0a64a4b1-efb5-45d1-a4c2-77783f18f0c4

Van Hardeveld, Gert, Webber, Craig and O'Hara, Kieron (2016) Discovering credit card fraud methods in online tutorials. OnSt ’16: Proceedings of the 1st International Workshop on Online Safety, Trust and Fraud Prevention, Hannover, Germany. 21 - 24 May 2016. 5 pp . (doi:10.1145/2915368.2915369).

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Online underground forums allow for the sharing of up-to-date knowledge on how to optimally commit an online crime. Tutorials focusing on specific online crimes are commonplace and provide members of underground communities with all the information needed to engage in illicit transactions. In this article, tutorials that focus on the online process of cashing out stolen credit card details, i.e. carding, will be analysed. A crime script analysis will reveal the most common ways in which carding is executed. We found that if these paths are meticulously followed, interceptive opportunities are limited for law enforcement. Cases of deviation from these paths are not uncommon, which renders situational crime prevention measures less effective. As a potential solution, we propose the uptake of prospect theory as an analytical tool to account for deviations from the criminal optimal norm. In future work, such a method could better account for all the various ways in which fraudulent activity is committed and contribute to thinking about new preventive measures.

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e-pub ahead of print date: 22 May 2016
Venue - Dates: OnSt ’16: Proceedings of the 1st International Workshop on Online Safety, Trust and Fraud Prevention, Hannover, Germany, 2016-05-21 - 2016-05-24
Organisations: Web & Internet Science

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 394077
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/394077
PURE UUID: bcdc00a2-e645-4616-8830-98c3cacbf47f
ORCID for Gert Van Hardeveld: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-8847-4662
ORCID for Craig Webber: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3900-7579
ORCID for Kieron O'Hara: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-9051-4456

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Date deposited: 03 Jun 2016 13:49
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 07:54

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