The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Contrasting population-level responses to Pleistocene climatic oscillations in an alpine bat revealed by complete mitochondrial genomes and evolutionary history inference

Contrasting population-level responses to Pleistocene climatic oscillations in an alpine bat revealed by complete mitochondrial genomes and evolutionary history inference
Contrasting population-level responses to Pleistocene climatic oscillations in an alpine bat revealed by complete mitochondrial genomes and evolutionary history inference
Aim: We used an integrative approach to reconstruct the evolutionary history of the alpine long-eared bat, Plecotus macrobullaris, to test whether the variable effects of Pleistocene climatic oscillations across geographical regions led to contrasting population-level demographic histories within a single species.

Location: The Western Palaearctic.

Methods: We sequenced the complete mitochondrial genomes of 57 individuals from across the distribution of the species. The analysis integrated ecological niche modelling (ENM), approximate Bayesian computation (ABC), measures of genetic diversity and Bayesian phylogenetic methods.

Results: We identified two deep lineages: a western lineage, restricted to the Pyrenees and the Alps, and an eastern lineage, which expanded across the mountain ranges east of the Dinarides (Croatia). ENM projections of past conditions predicted that climatic suitability was reduced during cold stages in the areas inhabited by the western lineage, while the opposite trend was observed in the mountains inhabited by the eastern lineage. The palaeodemographic scenario that best fitted our data is consistent with the western lineage population size having shrunk repeatedly because of the extensive glaciation events that occurred in the Alps and Pyrenees during the Pleistocene. In contrast, the eastern lineage maintained a constant population size as is consistent with more limited glaciation in the mountains of south-eastern Europe and the Middle East.

Main conclusions: This study shows that the demographic response of populations to Pleistocene climatic oscillations depended on their geographical location, offering an example of population-level variations in the effects and long-term consequences of climate change.
0305-0270
1689-1700
Alberdi, Antton
f7685efd-1b4f-4d28-a50f-a955c9b99ef1
Gilbert, M. Thomas P.
1614a657-2ff7-44ce-9117-144d2a0f95c0
Razgour, Orly
107f4912-304a-44d5-99f8-cdf2a9ce6f14
Aizpurua, Ostaizka
bbd3ecaa-2b5b-4b7e-b4fe-51714211f789
Aihartza, Joxerra
cd54df37-e51d-4961-9790-0865fdcae20d
Garin, Inazio
bb7fc966-8abe-4008-a1db-ab175403cbd5
Alberdi, Antton
f7685efd-1b4f-4d28-a50f-a955c9b99ef1
Gilbert, M. Thomas P.
1614a657-2ff7-44ce-9117-144d2a0f95c0
Razgour, Orly
107f4912-304a-44d5-99f8-cdf2a9ce6f14
Aizpurua, Ostaizka
bbd3ecaa-2b5b-4b7e-b4fe-51714211f789
Aihartza, Joxerra
cd54df37-e51d-4961-9790-0865fdcae20d
Garin, Inazio
bb7fc966-8abe-4008-a1db-ab175403cbd5

Alberdi, Antton, Gilbert, M. Thomas P., Razgour, Orly, Aizpurua, Ostaizka, Aihartza, Joxerra and Garin, Inazio (2015) Contrasting population-level responses to Pleistocene climatic oscillations in an alpine bat revealed by complete mitochondrial genomes and evolutionary history inference. Journal of Biogeography, 42 (9), 1689-1700. (doi:10.1111/jbi.12535).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Aim: We used an integrative approach to reconstruct the evolutionary history of the alpine long-eared bat, Plecotus macrobullaris, to test whether the variable effects of Pleistocene climatic oscillations across geographical regions led to contrasting population-level demographic histories within a single species.

Location: The Western Palaearctic.

Methods: We sequenced the complete mitochondrial genomes of 57 individuals from across the distribution of the species. The analysis integrated ecological niche modelling (ENM), approximate Bayesian computation (ABC), measures of genetic diversity and Bayesian phylogenetic methods.

Results: We identified two deep lineages: a western lineage, restricted to the Pyrenees and the Alps, and an eastern lineage, which expanded across the mountain ranges east of the Dinarides (Croatia). ENM projections of past conditions predicted that climatic suitability was reduced during cold stages in the areas inhabited by the western lineage, while the opposite trend was observed in the mountains inhabited by the eastern lineage. The palaeodemographic scenario that best fitted our data is consistent with the western lineage population size having shrunk repeatedly because of the extensive glaciation events that occurred in the Alps and Pyrenees during the Pleistocene. In contrast, the eastern lineage maintained a constant population size as is consistent with more limited glaciation in the mountains of south-eastern Europe and the Middle East.

Main conclusions: This study shows that the demographic response of populations to Pleistocene climatic oscillations depended on their geographical location, offering an example of population-level variations in the effects and long-term consequences of climate change.

Text
Alberdi et al 2015_Journal of Biogeography_proofs - Proof
Restricted to Repository staff only
Request a copy

More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 16 May 2015
Published date: September 2015
Organisations: Environmental

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 394218
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/394218
ISSN: 0305-0270
PURE UUID: 4b0e318e-31aa-4e54-8e52-c1c4f6f0d437
ORCID for Orly Razgour: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3186-0313

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 13 May 2016 07:57
Last modified: 07 Aug 2019 00:30

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×