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Baird-pattinson aetiological classification and phases of delay contributing to stillbirths in a Nigerian Tertiary Hospital

Baird-pattinson aetiological classification and phases of delay contributing to stillbirths in a Nigerian Tertiary Hospital
Baird-pattinson aetiological classification and phases of delay contributing to stillbirths in a Nigerian Tertiary Hospital
Purpose. This study aims to identify triggers of stillbirth in the study setting and to make suggestions to reduce the prevalence. Method. A three-year retrospective case-control study of stillbirths at Ekiti State University Teaching Hospital. Results. The stillbirth rate was 33 per 1000 births. Based on Baird-Pattinson classification of the primary obstetric causes of stillbirth, adverse intrapartum events, hypertensive diseases, and unexplained intrapartum fetal deaths were topmost causes of stillbirths. In comparison with the controls, other identified predictors of SB were grand multiparity (p = 0.016), delays in seeking medical care and/or in receiving treatment (p = 0.0001), wrong initial diagnosis (p = 0.0001), inadequate intrapartum monitoring (p = 0.0001), and inappropriate clinical management (p = 0.0001). Conclusion. Stillbirth rate remains high in our setting. Elimination of obstacles to accessing care, effective management of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy, updated health facilities, improved dedication to duty, and retraining of health workers will reduce the prevalence.
2090-2727
1-5
Awoleke, Jacob Olumuyiwa
57adb1ff-5884-4c29-a869-5d1300029429
Adanikin, Abiodun, Idowu
7c475e5b-223b-4d26-9b60-85b32af15727
Awoleke, Jacob Olumuyiwa
57adb1ff-5884-4c29-a869-5d1300029429
Adanikin, Abiodun, Idowu
7c475e5b-223b-4d26-9b60-85b32af15727

Awoleke, Jacob Olumuyiwa and Adanikin, Abiodun, Idowu (2016) Baird-pattinson aetiological classification and phases of delay contributing to stillbirths in a Nigerian Tertiary Hospital. Journal of Pregnancy, 2016, 1-5. (doi:10.1155/2016/1703809). (PMID:26885395)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Purpose. This study aims to identify triggers of stillbirth in the study setting and to make suggestions to reduce the prevalence. Method. A three-year retrospective case-control study of stillbirths at Ekiti State University Teaching Hospital. Results. The stillbirth rate was 33 per 1000 births. Based on Baird-Pattinson classification of the primary obstetric causes of stillbirth, adverse intrapartum events, hypertensive diseases, and unexplained intrapartum fetal deaths were topmost causes of stillbirths. In comparison with the controls, other identified predictors of SB were grand multiparity (p = 0.016), delays in seeking medical care and/or in receiving treatment (p = 0.0001), wrong initial diagnosis (p = 0.0001), inadequate intrapartum monitoring (p = 0.0001), and inappropriate clinical management (p = 0.0001). Conclusion. Stillbirth rate remains high in our setting. Elimination of obstacles to accessing care, effective management of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy, updated health facilities, improved dedication to duty, and retraining of health workers will reduce the prevalence.

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Accepted/In Press date: 22 December 2015
e-pub ahead of print date: 14 January 2016
Published date: 2016
Organisations: Social Statistics & Demography

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Local EPrints ID: 394256
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/394256
ISSN: 2090-2727
PURE UUID: b1af0f57-f524-4897-bb8b-99236bde4c44

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Date deposited: 12 May 2016 11:36
Last modified: 19 Jul 2019 20:05

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