The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Triaxial tests on an unbonded locked sand

Triaxial tests on an unbonded locked sand
Triaxial tests on an unbonded locked sand
This paper describes the results of a series of triaxial tests carried out to investigate the influence of fabric structure on the yield and failure behaviour of intact Reigate silver sand - a locked sand characterised by minimal cement content, large grain contacts, and a relative density index of 136%. Three distinct limiting stress envelopes are identified, based on (a) the start of dilation, (b) the maximum stress ratio during dilation, and (c) possible critical states. At effective cell pressures of 100 kPa and below, the stress ratio at the start of dilation is close to the maximum during subsequent dilation and much greater than at the critical state. At higher cell pressures, the material behaves more conventionally in that the maximum stress ratios are more clearly linked to maximum rates of dilation. The role and significance of dilation in a locked sand are discussed with reference to the development of strain localisations into shear planes, thin sections from samples subjected to differeing degrees of shear, and tests on unstructured sands.
fabric/structure of soils, laboratory tests, sands, shear strength
0016-8505
107-115
Cresswell, A.W.
dec05b35-af19-4309-9124-ed24c9df78e2
Powrie, W.
600c3f02-00f8-4486-ae4b-b4fc8ec77c3c
Cresswell, A.W.
dec05b35-af19-4309-9124-ed24c9df78e2
Powrie, W.
600c3f02-00f8-4486-ae4b-b4fc8ec77c3c

Cresswell, A.W. and Powrie, W. (2004) Triaxial tests on an unbonded locked sand. Géotechnique, 54 (2), 107-115. (doi:10.1680/geot.54.2.107.36335).

Record type: Article

Abstract

This paper describes the results of a series of triaxial tests carried out to investigate the influence of fabric structure on the yield and failure behaviour of intact Reigate silver sand - a locked sand characterised by minimal cement content, large grain contacts, and a relative density index of 136%. Three distinct limiting stress envelopes are identified, based on (a) the start of dilation, (b) the maximum stress ratio during dilation, and (c) possible critical states. At effective cell pressures of 100 kPa and below, the stress ratio at the start of dilation is close to the maximum during subsequent dilation and much greater than at the critical state. At higher cell pressures, the material behaves more conventionally in that the maximum stress ratios are more clearly linked to maximum rates of dilation. The role and significance of dilation in a locked sand are discussed with reference to the development of strain localisations into shear planes, thin sections from samples subjected to differeing degrees of shear, and tests on unstructured sands.

Text
geot.54.2.107.pdf - Version of Record
Restricted to Repository staff only
Request a copy

More information

Published date: January 2004
Keywords: fabric/structure of soils, laboratory tests, sands, shear strength
Organisations: Civil Engineering & the Environment

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 39438
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/39438
ISSN: 0016-8505
PURE UUID: 792f1a58-f5b9-4f01-90d7-02a9e58b40fe
ORCID for W. Powrie: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2271-0826

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 28 Jun 2006
Last modified: 15 Aug 2019 00:54

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×