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On the intermediate-redshift central stellar mass-halo mass relation, and implications for the evolution of the most massive galaxies since Z~1

On the intermediate-redshift central stellar mass-halo mass relation, and implications for the evolution of the most massive galaxies since Z~1
On the intermediate-redshift central stellar mass-halo mass relation, and implications for the evolution of the most massive galaxies since Z~1
The stellar mass-halo mass relation is a key constraint in all semi-analytic, numerical, and semi-empirical models of galaxy formation and evolution. However, its exact shape and redshift dependence remain under debate. Several recent works support a relation in the local universe steeper than previously thought. Based on comparisons with a variety of data on massive central galaxies, we show that this steepening holds up to z ~ 1 for stellar masses M star gsim 2 × 1011 M ?. Specifically, we find significant evidence for a high-mass end slope of ? gsim 0.35-0.70 instead of the usual ? lesssim 0.20-0.30 reported by a number of previous results. When including the independent constraints from the recent Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey clustering measurements, the data, independent of any systematic errors in stellar masses, tend to favor a model with a very small scatter (lesssim 0.15 dex) in stellar mass at fixed halo mass, in the redshift range z < 0.8 and for M star > 3 × 1011 M ?, suggesting a close connection between massive galaxies and host halos even at relatively recent epochs. We discuss the implications of our results with respect to the evolution of the most massive galaxies since z ~ 1.
2041-8205
1-6
Shankar, Francesco
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Guo, Hon
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Bouillot, Vincent
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Rettura, Alessandro
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Meert, Alan
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Buchan, Stewart
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Kravtsov, Andrey
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Bernardi, Mariangela
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Sheth, Ravi
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Vikrum, Vinu
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Marchesini, Danilo
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Behroozie, Peter
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Zheng, Zheng
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Maraston, Claudia
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Ascasp, Begona
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Lemaux, Brian C.
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Capozzi, Diego
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Huertas-Company, Marc
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Gal, Roy R.
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Lubin, Lori M.
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Conselice, Christopher J.
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Carollo, Marcella
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Cattaneo, Andrea
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Shankar, Francesco
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Guo, Hon
73ec8667-4e8b-47a8-9f57-f17b6a4a9963
Bouillot, Vincent
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Rettura, Alessandro
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Meert, Alan
acca7405-016e-428c-afd3-711efb79f571
Buchan, Stewart
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Kravtsov, Andrey
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Bernardi, Mariangela
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Sheth, Ravi
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Vikrum, Vinu
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Marchesini, Danilo
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Behroozie, Peter
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Zheng, Zheng
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Maraston, Claudia
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Ascasp, Begona
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Lemaux, Brian C.
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Capozzi, Diego
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Huertas-Company, Marc
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Gal, Roy R.
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Lubin, Lori M.
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Conselice, Christopher J.
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Carollo, Marcella
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Cattaneo, Andrea
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Shankar, Francesco, Guo, Hon, Bouillot, Vincent, Rettura, Alessandro, Meert, Alan, Buchan, Stewart, Kravtsov, Andrey, Bernardi, Mariangela, Sheth, Ravi, Vikrum, Vinu, Marchesini, Danilo, Behroozie, Peter, Zheng, Zheng, Maraston, Claudia, Ascasp, Begona, Lemaux, Brian C., Capozzi, Diego, Huertas-Company, Marc, Gal, Roy R., Lubin, Lori M., Conselice, Christopher J., Carollo, Marcella and Cattaneo, Andrea (2014) On the intermediate-redshift central stellar mass-halo mass relation, and implications for the evolution of the most massive galaxies since Z~1. The Astrophysical Journal Letters, 797 (L27), 1-6. (doi:10.1088/2041-8205/797/2/L27).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The stellar mass-halo mass relation is a key constraint in all semi-analytic, numerical, and semi-empirical models of galaxy formation and evolution. However, its exact shape and redshift dependence remain under debate. Several recent works support a relation in the local universe steeper than previously thought. Based on comparisons with a variety of data on massive central galaxies, we show that this steepening holds up to z ~ 1 for stellar masses M star gsim 2 × 1011 M ?. Specifically, we find significant evidence for a high-mass end slope of ? gsim 0.35-0.70 instead of the usual ? lesssim 0.20-0.30 reported by a number of previous results. When including the independent constraints from the recent Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey clustering measurements, the data, independent of any systematic errors in stellar masses, tend to favor a model with a very small scatter (lesssim 0.15 dex) in stellar mass at fixed halo mass, in the redshift range z < 0.8 and for M star > 3 × 1011 M ?, suggesting a close connection between massive galaxies and host halos even at relatively recent epochs. We discuss the implications of our results with respect to the evolution of the most massive galaxies since z ~ 1.

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Accepted/In Press date: 9 November 2014
e-pub ahead of print date: 9 December 2014
Published date: 20 December 2014
Organisations: Astronomy Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 394757
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/394757
ISSN: 2041-8205
PURE UUID: 1f3747a2-4f15-4c53-9396-9e822a3ef013

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Date deposited: 24 May 2016 08:47
Last modified: 21 Nov 2021 01:42

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Contributors

Author: Hon Guo
Author: Vincent Bouillot
Author: Alessandro Rettura
Author: Alan Meert
Author: Stewart Buchan
Author: Andrey Kravtsov
Author: Mariangela Bernardi
Author: Ravi Sheth
Author: Vinu Vikrum
Author: Danilo Marchesini
Author: Peter Behroozie
Author: Zheng Zheng
Author: Claudia Maraston
Author: Begona Ascasp
Author: Brian C. Lemaux
Author: Diego Capozzi
Author: Marc Huertas-Company
Author: Roy R. Gal
Author: Lori M. Lubin
Author: Christopher J. Conselice
Author: Marcella Carollo
Author: Andrea Cattaneo

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