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An investigation into the microbial clogging potential of selected filter media as a result of biodegradation of a high-strength sulphate-rich alkaline leachate

An investigation into the microbial clogging potential of selected filter media as a result of biodegradation of a high-strength sulphate-rich alkaline leachate
An investigation into the microbial clogging potential of selected filter media as a result of biodegradation of a high-strength sulphate-rich alkaline leachate
The research examines the potential for bio-clogging in filter packs containing fine sand of the type typically used in extraction wells for pumping leachates containing fine particulate matter, such as cement kiln dust (CKD). Three filter media with different particle sizes were used: 1.7–4.75, 0.35–1.0, and 0.235–0.45 mm.
Each sand filter was tested using a leachate recirculating column reactor with a free drainage layer, on top of which was placed the filtration medium which was kept saturated and at a positive hydrostatic head by a 2-l reservoir of leachate. The leachate was collected from a landfill site that had been used for the co-disposal of municipal solid waste (MSW) and CKD. The leachate used was filtered by passing through a Whatman GFA filter paper before being added to the reactors in order to eliminate as far as possible the non-biological clogging which might have resulted from the introduction of particulate matter in the form of CKD.
The filters and a control experiment were run under anaerobic conditions at 35 °C. The bio-clogging potential was observed by taking differential manometer readings from manometers located in the drainage and reservoir sections of the reactor. No clogging was detected using the coarser of the filter media, but there was some clogging when a finer filter medium was used. Head space gas analysis indicated that methanogenic activity was inhibited and analysis of the liquid phase indicated that the microbial process responsible for removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD) was principally one of sulphate reduction.
anaerobic biodegradation, cement kiln dust, clogging, filter pack, landfill, leachate
0923-9820
1572-9729
Wang, Zhengjian
6ee8e2f0-35a2-4e0c-b818-c7837cd75b94
Banks, Charles
5c6c8c4b-5b25-4e37-9058-50fa8d2e926f
Wang, Zhengjian
6ee8e2f0-35a2-4e0c-b818-c7837cd75b94
Banks, Charles
5c6c8c4b-5b25-4e37-9058-50fa8d2e926f

Wang, Zhengjian and Banks, Charles (1970) An investigation into the microbial clogging potential of selected filter media as a result of biodegradation of a high-strength sulphate-rich alkaline leachate. Biodegradation, 1572-9729.

Record type: Article

Abstract

The research examines the potential for bio-clogging in filter packs containing fine sand of the type typically used in extraction wells for pumping leachates containing fine particulate matter, such as cement kiln dust (CKD). Three filter media with different particle sizes were used: 1.7–4.75, 0.35–1.0, and 0.235–0.45 mm.
Each sand filter was tested using a leachate recirculating column reactor with a free drainage layer, on top of which was placed the filtration medium which was kept saturated and at a positive hydrostatic head by a 2-l reservoir of leachate. The leachate was collected from a landfill site that had been used for the co-disposal of municipal solid waste (MSW) and CKD. The leachate used was filtered by passing through a Whatman GFA filter paper before being added to the reactors in order to eliminate as far as possible the non-biological clogging which might have resulted from the introduction of particulate matter in the form of CKD.
The filters and a control experiment were run under anaerobic conditions at 35 °C. The bio-clogging potential was observed by taking differential manometer readings from manometers located in the drainage and reservoir sections of the reactor. No clogging was detected using the coarser of the filter media, but there was some clogging when a finer filter medium was used. Head space gas analysis indicated that methanogenic activity was inhibited and analysis of the liquid phase indicated that the microbial process responsible for removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD) was principally one of sulphate reduction.

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More information

Published date: 1 January 1970
Keywords: anaerobic biodegradation, cement kiln dust, clogging, filter pack, landfill, leachate

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 39479
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/39479
ISSN: 0923-9820
PURE UUID: c45c73c3-639e-43eb-8a0c-918c15eb775a

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 28 Jun 2006
Last modified: 27 Oct 2017 07:00

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