The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Intergenerational exchanges, children's education and parents' longevity in Europe

Intergenerational exchanges, children's education and parents' longevity in Europe
Intergenerational exchanges, children's education and parents' longevity in Europe
The link between children’s health and the education of their parents, especially mothers, is now well established. However, far less is known about the possible influence of the educational attainment of adult children on the health of their parents. This study investigates the relationship between the education of adult children and the longevity of older parents using individual-level longitudinal data for 11 countries from the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE). Of particular interest is whether having well-educated adult children is associated with a health benefit for their parents. Cox proportional hazard models predict the risk of death for mothers and for fathers as a function of (a) adult children’s education, and (b) the difference between the educational attainment of child and parent. Regional variation across Europe is also examined. The results indicate that adult children’s educational attainment is independently related to
parental mortality after controlling for possible confounders, and that having children with upper secondary or tertiary levels of education is associated with a significantly reduced risk of mortality if the parents do not have tertiary education. Further, a similar pattern of association is found across regions with different levels of welfare provision, family forms
and regimes of help and care. Although the analyses cannot determine the causal direction of the intergenerational exchange, we argue that the results suggest upward health transfers from adult children to their parents and thus support an intergenerational approach to health policy interventions.
2042-4116
77
ESRC Centre for Population Change
Graham, Elspeth
44e94ad4-8fbe-485e-9353-6a83af3c33f7
Sabater, Albert
2fc95c0d-5e3e-410a-9c06-7b7c7c045d12
Mcgowan, Teresa
4524e894-04de-4822-8508-f4b966e12ae2
Graham, Elspeth
44e94ad4-8fbe-485e-9353-6a83af3c33f7
Sabater, Albert
2fc95c0d-5e3e-410a-9c06-7b7c7c045d12
Mcgowan, Teresa
4524e894-04de-4822-8508-f4b966e12ae2

Graham, Elspeth and Sabater, Albert , Mcgowan, Teresa (ed.) (2016) Intergenerational exchanges, children's education and parents' longevity in Europe (ESRC Centre for Population Change Working Papers, 77) Southampton, GB. ESRC Centre for Population Change 34pp.

Record type: Monograph (Working Paper)

Abstract

The link between children’s health and the education of their parents, especially mothers, is now well established. However, far less is known about the possible influence of the educational attainment of adult children on the health of their parents. This study investigates the relationship between the education of adult children and the longevity of older parents using individual-level longitudinal data for 11 countries from the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE). Of particular interest is whether having well-educated adult children is associated with a health benefit for their parents. Cox proportional hazard models predict the risk of death for mothers and for fathers as a function of (a) adult children’s education, and (b) the difference between the educational attainment of child and parent. Regional variation across Europe is also examined. The results indicate that adult children’s educational attainment is independently related to
parental mortality after controlling for possible confounders, and that having children with upper secondary or tertiary levels of education is associated with a significantly reduced risk of mortality if the parents do not have tertiary education. Further, a similar pattern of association is found across regions with different levels of welfare provision, family forms
and regimes of help and care. Although the analyses cannot determine the causal direction of the intergenerational exchange, we argue that the results suggest upward health transfers from adult children to their parents and thus support an intergenerational approach to health policy interventions.

Text
2016_WP77_Intergenerational_exchanges_childrens_education_and_parents_longevity_in_Europe.pdf - Other
Download (1MB)

More information

Published date: 20 May 2016
Organisations: Social Statistics & Demography, Centre for Population Change

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 394875
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/394875
ISSN: 2042-4116
PURE UUID: 3079ae0e-15f0-4e60-89e9-9d99624904ab

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 25 May 2016 08:46
Last modified: 22 Jul 2022 19:56

Export record

Contributors

Author: Elspeth Graham
Author: Albert Sabater
Editor: Teresa Mcgowan

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×